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Old 06-23-2006, 04:46 PM   #41
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East Manchester is bigger than West Manchester in population and land area. Unlike Portland and So. Portland, E and W Manch are the same city.
but how do they "feel." do they feel like the same city, or is the river a boundary of sorts?
Yep.
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Old 07-07-2006, 11:30 AM   #42
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School goes on a buying spree

By DALE VINCENT
Union Leader Staff

Manchester ? After buying two downtown buildings in a month this spring, the New Hampshire Institute of Art is taking an acquisition breather, according to its development director Jessica Kinsey.

The buying spree, totaling nearly a million dollars, gives the growing school new office space at 153 Concord St. and a new three-unit apartment building at 90 Harrison St. to house upperclassmen.

Those purchases followed by a year the acquisition of the former Stan?s Masury Paint Store at 77 Amherst St., which was remodeled and expanded for academic use, and The Hampshire, 11 Walnut St., for dormitory space for female students.

The school now owns six downtown buildings, plus holds a lease on the third and fourth floors of the Mechanic Street Manchester YMCA building, which is used for dorm rooms.

The school was founded in 1898, offering courses in physical sciences, entomology, botany, ornithology, mineralogy and fine arts, and later, zoology, as the Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences. But it has shifted its focus several times.

The latest shift began in 1996 when it became the New Hampshire Institute of Art, a four-year degree-granting school. Then-president Andrew Svedlow predicted the BFA program would remain small, about 100 students, with 25 students enrolled each year starting in fall 1997.

This fall, the school is looking at an incoming class of 120 degree-seeking students, Kinsey said. In 1999, she said, there were six students in the degree program. Last year, there were 238.

In addition, she said, some 1,500 people a year, ages 15 and up, take non-credit courses at the school, which now offers ceramics, illustration, photography, painting, interdisciplinary and art education programs.

As the school has grown, Kinsey said, ?The demographic is shifting in the BFA program.?

When it began, there were more non-traditional or older students. Now, she said, most are fresh out of high school and they want a traditional college campus experience.

That put the school in the housing business two years ago. The school has 91 beds in its dormitories.

It offers male and female students housing at the YMCA and the Harrison Street apartment building, and female students housing at The Hampshire on Walnut Street, formerly operated by the Settlement Association of New Hampshire as a rooming house for single working women.

What hasn?t changed, Kinsey said, is that the student body continues to skew female, which could be considered appropriate, given the critical support prominent Manchester women have given the institute over the years.

Emma Blood French donated the first institute building at 148 Concord St., and her granddaughter, Mary Fuller Russell, left the school $24 million at her death in 1995.

Margaret and Mary Fuller Hall at 156 Hanover St., named for Russell and her mother, was purchased for a half-million dollars in 1998 and renovated at a cost of $2 million. It houses the institute?s administration, photography program and library.
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Old 07-07-2006, 11:39 AM   #43
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UNH expands in Manchester

By JOHN WHITSON
Union Leader Staff


Manchester ? The University of New Hampshire at Manchester is feeling some growing pains.

In a good way.

The university?s Center for Graduate and Professional Studies, jockeying for classroom space after growing from 100 to 360 students over its five years, is moving down the street.

As of July 17, the graduate program will move south from the university center and call 286 Commercial St. home. The building already houses the administrative offices of the Manchester School District on the second floor.

?For us, it?s a major change,? said Kate Ferreira, the graduate center?s director. ?This really is going to create the concept of campus.?

Students will be able to park throughout the Millyard, she said, and remain within easy walking distance to either university center.

The Manchester campus offers eight master?s degree programs. Some courses may still be held at one of 400 Commercial St.?s 28 classrooms, said Ferreira, but the bulk of graduate-level teaching will take place down the street, starting next month.

The seven classrooms with office space for three employees is being leased.

?This is probably going to be a temporary move until something gets finalized with the city,? said Ferreira, referring to Manchester?s ongoing efforts to develop a mixed-use facility in the Millyard that would include a UNH at Manchester science and technology center.

?We?ve been looking at different options over there for a couple of years,? said Harry Richards, dean of UNH?s graduate school on the main campus in Durham. ?The growth of the center has been phenomenal.?

Ferreira said the graduate center, which includes about 50 continuing education students who aren?t in a degree program, has proved popular in part because it knows its audience.

?Our target is really the working professional, for students to come to school at night,? she said. Courses are structured in a variety of ways to accommodate older students with families and other commitments.

UNH at Manchester bills itself as the urban arm of the Durham campus. As such, said Ferreira, undergraduate programs are also often structured to fit nontraditional students.

?We?re competing for space to accommodate that population,? she said, ?so (the move) really works out well.

?It?s a wonderful opportunity to expand, and it can be used during the day for professional development and training seminars. It will really lend itself to being a (university) center,? she said.

Richards said professional workshops will help to solidify UNH at Manchester?s connection to the city itself. To host such seminars in the past, he said, the university often had to borrow space from Springfield College at 500 Commercial St.

He said separating the undergraduate and graduate programs will allow the university to stop being a victim of its own success.

?Once we opened the graduate center and started offering these programs, we created a real space crunch in that building in the evenings,? Richards said. ?We couldn?t expand. We couldn?t grow.?
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Old 07-28-2006, 12:38 AM   #44
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Why the hell aren't they building this in Manch? Who wants to live in Raymond?

More details on Exit 4 project
By TOBY HENRY
Union Leader Correspondent

Raymond ? The ambitious $60 million Granite Meadows development plan debuted before an inquisitive Planning Board last night as town officials queried the proposal's effect on the region.

The five-member board seemed particularly concerned about traffic and wetlands impact. In opening discussions on the project, Auburn developer Elmer Pease, mastermind of the long-awaited project near Exit 4, said that at least one new entrance near Scribner Road has been added and that a traffic signal might also ease traffic buildup.

Later, board member Frank Bourque returned to the traffic-light issue, stating that the light might become a necessity at the Manchester Road intersection as development continues at Exit 4. The move is also likely to please potential retailers, Bourque said.

"It just makes a lot of sense "? because the next guy (developer) who comes along may be putting a signal at Scribner Road," Bourque said.

Although the 40-acre Granite Meadows project has been the subject of much discussion and at least two public presentations during the past year, last night's hearing was the first official presentation of the plan before town officials. The Granite Meadows plan involves two, seven-story condominium buildings of 96 units each, a 7,500-square-foot restaurant, a 200-room hotel and almost 150,000 feet of retail space.

Bourque pointed out that the Exit 4 area's sewer overlay district, approved by voters in March, specified that "no more than 25 percent" of the lot was intended for use as residential space.

Bourque asked Pease if his plan took this into account, and Pease responded that the residential variance he was granted specifically mentions the approval of the 192 residential units he intends for that lot.

Later, Pease's engineer Matt Peterson said that some nine areas of wetlands, comprising almost 150,000 square feet, have been identified at the site. But he noted that much of that area may be due to recent rains; in the months before the heavy downpours in May, only about 105,000 square feet of wetlands had been identified at the site.

If approved, Peterson said that an upgrade to Scribner Road is also likely to be part of the project.
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Old 07-29-2006, 09:27 PM   #45
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Why the hell aren't they building this in Manch? Who wants to live in Raymond?

More details on Exit 4 project
By TOBY HENRY
Union Leader Correspondent

Raymond ? The ambitious $60 million Granite Meadows development plan debuted before an inquisitive Planning Board last night as town officials queried the proposal's effect on the region.

The five-member board seemed particularly concerned about traffic and wetlands impact. In opening discussions on the project, Auburn developer Elmer Pease, mastermind of the long-awaited project near Exit 4, said that at least one new entrance near Scribner Road has been added and that a traffic signal might also ease traffic buildup.

Later, board member Frank Bourque returned to the traffic-light issue, stating that the light might become a necessity at the Manchester Road intersection as development continues at Exit 4. The move is also likely to please potential retailers, Bourque said.

"It just makes a lot of sense "? because the next guy (developer) who comes along may be putting a signal at Scribner Road," Bourque said.

Although the 40-acre Granite Meadows project has been the subject of much discussion and at least two public presentations during the past year, last night's hearing was the first official presentation of the plan before town officials. The Granite Meadows plan involves two, seven-story condominium buildings of 96 units each, a 7,500-square-foot restaurant, a 200-room hotel and almost 150,000 feet of retail space.

Bourque pointed out that the Exit 4 area's sewer overlay district, approved by voters in March, specified that "no more than 25 percent" of the lot was intended for use as residential space.

Bourque asked Pease if his plan took this into account, and Pease responded that the residential variance he was granted specifically mentions the approval of the 192 residential units he intends for that lot.

Later, Pease's engineer Matt Peterson said that some nine areas of wetlands, comprising almost 150,000 square feet, have been identified at the site. But he noted that much of that area may be due to recent rains; in the months before the heavy downpours in May, only about 105,000 square feet of wetlands had been identified at the site.

If approved, Peterson said that an upgrade to Scribner Road is also likely to be part of the project.
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Old 08-26-2006, 12:47 AM   #46
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Build this downtown, not on Hackett Hill :x

Jobs Corps center proposed

By JOHN WHITSON AND RILEY YATES
Union Leader Staff

Manchester ? A proposal to build a $30 million Jobs Corps center in Manchester will be submitted to the U.S. Labor Department next month.

Economic Development Director Paul Borek said the city learned yesterday it was selected among possible New Hampshire communities to host what would be the state's first Job Corps center.

The center could be situated next to the city's Hackett Hill commercial park, though other sites would need to be investigated and brought before aldermen, Borek said.

A no-cost education and vocational training program, Job Corps serves disadvantaged youth ages 16 to 24, partnering with local business to offer alternative education.

The program, which lasts from eight months to two years and is largely residential, has a long history of success. More than 60,000 young people participate at 122 sites each year, and about 90 percent of graduates go on to jobs, higher education or the military.

The federally funded project would create up to 120 jobs and serve about 300 people at any given time, said Michael Power, Workforce Opportunity Council president.

"A Job Corps would be a major benefit to New Hampshire in several areas," said Power. "First, it would provide a truly outstanding educational opportunity for kids where high school is not the answer. It would also provide a tremendous pipeline for New Hampshire employers ?? who have been shortchanged."

New Hampshire and Wyoming are the only states in the nation without a Job Corps center.

There are expected to be 25 to 30 proposals submitted by this year's Sept. 30 deadline, and one of those will come from Wyoming. The Labor Department is expected to approve just one or two of the plans.

A press conference announcing the application will be held Tuesday at 2 p.m. at City Hall. It will include Sen. Judd Gregg, Rep. Jeb Bradley, Gov. John Lynch and Manchester Mayor Frank Guinta.

"Our state's employers need educated and skilled workers to compete in today's global and fast-changing marketplace," said Gregg in a statement.

"The Job Corps center will provide the opportunity for those who wish to enter the work force to acquire the skills needed for tomorrow's jobs."

Lynch said the proposal deserves unequivocal support.

"In order to have a successful proposal, we have to work together to present the most comprehensive job training proposal possible," he said, "and that is why I am urging everyone at the state and local level to fully support this project."

New Hampshire has never submitted a Job Corps center proposal before, but the state task force has been at work for about three years.

"We stand a good shot this year, but we need to be competitive," said Dick Anagnost, chairman of the Workforce Opportunity Council.

He added without elaboration that New Hampshire's proposal will include "curriculum that no one else has."

Anagnost said Gregg's clout as chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee won't come into play at that point, but will have already been felt.

He said Gregg was able to get appropriations language approved two years ago that gives preferential treatment to states without Job Corps centers.

Borek said Job Corps centers typically lead to school dropout rates falling in the communities they are in. They offer unique and specialized training that can be attractive for students, the business community and investors, he said.

Power said it's vital that the state get its own Job Corps center.

"There are New Hampshire kids who attend Job Corps, but they have to travel hundreds of miles away," he said. "And because it's successful, these kids often are hired by the local employers and don't come back to New Hampshire. So we're losing some of the best opportunities we have for a skilled work force."
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Old 08-30-2006, 12:38 AM   #47
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i'd like to see west remain a high school, it's got great character

West's future debated


By RILEY YATES
Union Leader Staff

Manchester ? A committee will within a month recommend two options for addressing West High School's future as Bedford students leave, a key step toward a makeover that could vastly change the school.

A myriad of proposals remains on the table, including plans to redistrict, expand programs such as performing arts or engineering, or add seventh and eight graders now attending the Middle School at Parkside.

Several members of the Committee to Study West's Future said no consensus has been reached over which plans will make it to Superintendent Michael Ludwell's desk, despite an October deadline for submitting a report.

"There's a number of scenarios that are still out there," said Assistant Superintendent Frank Bass, the co-chairman of the 19-member committee. "There have been no conclusions."

Two final meetings of the committee are scheduled next month on Sept. 13 and Sept. 27. The Manchester school board will have final say over the two recommendations, once they are reviewed by Ludwell.

At the most recent panel on West, four subcommittees presented different plans for the future of the school, which is losing nearly 40 percent of its students with Bedford's decision to build its own high school.

One proposal calls for a shift across West Side schools in Manchester, with West High including seventh and eighth graders and Parkside operating as an upper elementary school serving grades four through six.

Gossler Park School would become a lower elementary school that houses kindergarten through third grade.

The shuffling would ease overcrowding at Northwest Elementary School and allow the three schools to take on Manchester Development Preschool, which is eventually losing the lease for its home on Auburn Street, Bass said.

Redistricting could include shifting Hooksett children now at Central High School over to West. But it also might involve plucking Central students regardless of town, or moving students from both Central and Memorial, said Joanne McHugh, the chairman of the Hooksett school board and a member of the committee.

McHugh said it isn't clear what the options are.

"I'm not a big fan of redistricting, but I'm certainly willing to see how this plan would play out," she said.

Other proposals include expanding specialized offerings such as ROTC, the performing arts and engineering programs, Bass said, pulling interested students from Central and Memorial.

The fledging gifted and talented program might also be housed at the school, as could school district headquarters.

Bass said he expects a "hodgepodge and blending" of options.

"What the committee is really wrestling with is trying to take the best ideas of each proposals," Bass said. "There might be some redistricting. The Parkside shift might only include eighth grade. I'm just throwing ideas out here."

Finances will also play a part, Bass said, as do tuition agreements that slate slots at each school for students from surrounding communities.

The school district estimates it will lose a net of $2 million next school year when 450 Bedford freshmen and sophomores stop attending West.

The year after, 225 Bedford juniors quit the school, a loss of $1 million in revenue, Bass said. In June 2009, the final senior class graduates, a loss of 250 students and another $1 million.

The projected financial hit comes despite an expected winnowing of staff: 15 to 20 employees next year, and eight to 10 in each of the two following years, Bass said. It may also limit the ideas Manchester can pursue, he said.

State Sen. Lou D'Allesandro, a member of the committee, said he hopes final proposals end up being a combination of different plans.

But D'Allesandro said he wants West to remain a high school, given its history.

"I'm a West Sider," said D'Allesandro. "All of my children went to West. My wife went to West."

"Does that mean redistricting?" he added. "I think that needs to be discussed."
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Old 09-05-2006, 12:41 AM   #48
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SNHU opens 2 new dorms
Union Leader Staff

HOOKSETT ? It's not just Southern New Hampshire University's student population that continues to grow.

The campus itself, which straddles the Manchester-Hooksett municipal line, is expanding. Two gleaming residence halls opened their doors for the first time this week in advance of the start of fall classes tomorrow.

"The fact that we're getting more and more students from outside the state necessitates the need for additional housing," said Gregg Mazzola, university spokesman, during a tour of the new dorms Friday.

SNHU has accepted 569 freshmen for the fall semester. That's up 19 percent from last year's class of 479.

This year's freshmen hail from 26 different states, and 30 of the students are coming from outside the country.

They all need a place to sleep, and the lucky ones will call Hampton Hall and Windsor Hall home.

The three-story brick buildings cost about $11 million and are perched atop a hill overlooking the Merrimack River on the Hooksett side of campus.

At 43,100 square feet each, the nearly identical structures took about 13 months to build and will each house 130 students, mostly sophomores.

The air-conditioned dorms are just up the hill from Lincoln Hall and Conway Hall, residence halls that will begin their third year of use this fall.

Bob Schiavoni, SNHU's director of residence life, said the school now has 18 dormitories housing from 60 to 240 students.

"I think they turned out very, very well," said Schiavoni, looking around the interior of Windsor Hall.

The design, which features 22 suites, private baths, large common areas, study and game rooms, a 130-seat meeting room, a kitchen and a laundry room, is the result of studying recent construction at other universities and listening to what the students wanted.

"I'm presuming they're going to be pleasantly pleased when they arrive," said Schiavoni.

There are no plans on the table for more residence halls in the near future, said Mazzola, but the university continues to change and evolve:

*A ground-breaking ceremony will take place soon on a new dining hall expected to be ready for use in September 2008.

*There is an ongoing fundraising campaign for a new School of Community Economic Development building.

*The online learning program offices moved to Manchester's Millyard this summer after outgrowing on-campus space.

*A master of science in justice studies will be offered online, starting in March 2007.

*A bachelor's program in justice studies will be available on campus, starting in September 2007.

"We have a tremendous amount going on," said Mazzola.
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Old 09-26-2006, 10:54 AM   #49
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Raymond Exit 4 Development

I know this is the Manchester thread, but there was an article about this a page or two back.

Job-growth potential spurs Granite Meadows
By TOBY HENRY
Union Leader Correspondent
10 hours, 48 minutes ago

Raymond ? Economic consultants and town officials say the proposed Granite Meadows development for Exit 4 could help boost job prospects and offset losses to a local employment market that has been dwindling during the first years of the 21st Century.

According to data from the New Hampshire Employment Security Commission, Raymond has seen its job market shrink from a peak of 2,775 jobs in the year 2000 to 2,582 jobs in 2004, the last year for which statistics are available. The data indicate a 7.2 percent loss to the total number of jobs available in Raymond, where many local businesses focus on construction and contracting work.

Russ Thibeault, an economic consultant hired by the town, said the current job market is a far cry from the late 1990s, when the massive Wal-Mart Distribution Center project revitalized the local employment market by offering more than 600 new jobs. Thibeault presented this data at last week's public hearing on a proposed water treatment plant that would serve the Exit 4 project.

Town officials say the recent ongoing job losses are likely a combination of downsizing and business closure.

"It's surprising that it's that high, but we have had some businesses losing jobs, and it wouldn't take much to have a negative impact," Town Manager Rick Bates said.

But Granite Meadows -- a development proposing to build two seven-story 96-unit condominium buildings, a 7,500-square-foot restaurant, a 200-room hotel and almost 150,000 feet of retail space -- could more than offset recent losses by bringing as many as 300 new jobs to town, said Thibeault. He said the plan could put Raymond in situations similar to those seen in Hooksett and Tilton, where recent developments near highway exits have brought in hundreds of jobs, mostly in retail.

According to Granite Meadows developer Elmer Pease, the complex, if approved, would concentrate most of its job offerings in its retail stores and the hotel, which are expected to create more than 100 jobs. Although the possibility exists for some career-oriented jobs, Pease said, he expects the new businesses would largely answer the long-standing question of where Raymond's teens would work during their high school years.

As it now stands, many working teenagers -- much like the 85 percent of all working adults in town -- must travel outside of Raymond to find jobs.

"And this is something that I've talked to parents about, and they have mentioned that it's discouraging for (their children) to have to go to, say, Manchester or Exeter to get a job," he said.

While many job offerings from Granite Meadows might favor teenagers, Thibeault said future development at Exit 4's 300 total acres -- which could bring in more than 600,000 square feet of development in the next 20 years -- has the potential to bring in hundreds of large-scale light-industry and office jobs during the next generation.

"Office space will definitely help (the local job market), and by my analysis, it can generate up to 3 employees for every 100 square feet of space," Thibeault said. "Nobody knows exactly what is going to happen, and there are no guarantees, but I've seen development like this pay off for towns all around the interstate (Interstate 93)."
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Old 09-26-2006, 10:57 AM   #50
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ive got a friend who lived in manchester for a few months, and she is from portland. says manchester has a lot more going on down there than we have up here. I will eed to investigate :wink:
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Old 09-26-2006, 11:49 AM   #51
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But Patrick, we have the westin...I mean Waterview, I mean Lincoln....nevermind.
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Old 09-26-2006, 05:17 PM   #52
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custom house square, todays press herald. walker terrace. graves hill. kimbal court. the longfellow. ocean properties ltd proposal. ocean gateway...etc. intermed. AAA expansion. Mercy. maine med.

Speaking of projects, what is the latest and greatest down in Manchester these days? anything of height in the talks or drawing board stages?
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Old 09-27-2006, 10:05 AM   #53
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If there is anything big being planned in Manchester, I haven't heard of it.
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Old 09-27-2006, 05:46 PM   #54
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Hey, I certainly have been out of the archboston 'loop' for quite some time. Junior year of high school is kicking my ass, so I have literally minutes of free time a day. It's nice to be commenting after such a long time of withdrawal. Anyways, I haven't heard of any recent big plans for Manchester as far as office or residential development goes. I have noticed some pretty substantial real estate juggling going on though, as the New Hampshire Plaza Tower recently switched hands, as did the TD Bank North Building. Brady Sullivan is tightening its grips in the area, so I wonder if the next big development will be their doings (?). The new ballpark is finished, as is the Hilton, and I must say that those add a lot to the city's core. Game nights funnel everyone into downtown and the new hotel sure is classy! The Granite Street widening is also continuing, and that should make a much more stately entrance to the city. I believe they are adding a bike lane and park as part of that plan, so that should be nice. The Manchester Place Apartments are also finished now, adding a good chunk of residential to the downtown. So it's obvious that development is tediously slow, but appreciated nonetheless. Every time I go into downtown I am more and more pleased with what I see. If only Guinta could get the crime taken care of! All these knife-wielding idiots don't realize what they do to their very own city.
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Old 09-27-2006, 11:29 PM   #55
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Silly Patrick, we'd rather close down businesses than open up any new ones :roll:

City sets sights on Club Envy

http://www.unionleader.com/article.a...3-6e414877e1f5

Another Manchester club loses liquor license
http://www.wcax.com/Global/story.asp...&nav=menu183_2
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Old 09-27-2006, 11:52 PM   #56
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I have heard that the Tower Mill, recently bought by a New Haven company, will almost certainly be redeveloped into condos. Right now they're negotiating with the city over several issues. The mill will likely see significant improvements, since its not in great shape now. The building itself is really enormous (picture doesn't do justice). Right now they're trying to come up w/ some kind of parking solution (trying to get city help), also the city is adament that the mill have some ground floor retail/restaurant space.

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Old 09-28-2006, 07:31 AM   #57
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Silly Patrick, we'd rather close down businesses than open up any new ones :roll:

City sets sights on Club Envy

http://www.unionleader.com/article.a...3-6e414877e1f5

Another Manchester club loses liquor license
http://www.wcax.com/Global/story.asp...&nav=menu183_2

Don't worry..portland is the same exact way. our club district has essentially evaporated into thin air. Well, actually it has been replaced by a "pub district" which is sorta more upscale, and more restaurants and stuff...but you gotta have the clubs close before anything else moves in. If envy was in a good location, than i bet a restaurant will fill the shell it leaves behind, and that will be good for the city.
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Old 09-28-2006, 07:34 AM   #58
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I have heard that the Tower Mill, recently bought by a New Haven company, will almost certainly be redeveloped into condos. Right now they're negotiating with the city over several issues. The mill will likely see significant improvements, since its not in great shape now. The building itself is really enormous (picture doesn't do justice). Right now they're trying to come up w/ some kind of parking solution (trying to get city help), also the city is adament that the mill have some ground floor retail/restaurant space.

thats cool. if they could change the look of the buildings so they weren't so obviously former "mills" then i would like these types of projects a lot more. I like the density a mill building offers, but i think they would need some new (slanted?) roofs or something..just to clarify that there IS something going on in there other than manufacturing. its great if people live in them, but even better if outsider can perceive their presence. think the mills are the single most detrimental factor to a town's image when they remain mill-looking. because we all know what type of reputation most other mill towns have. providence and manchester (lowell too?) are and have shed theirs...but it must have been difficult).
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Old 09-28-2006, 08:04 PM   #59
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It would be great if this mill turned into condos. The Millyard, and really just downtown in general, could use more residents. It would definitely provide the area with a more 24/7 feel. And renovated mills always have that hip connotation of real urban living. Speaking of residents in downtown, does anyone have an idea of how sales are at Manchester Place? I don't know what the vacancy (if any) is like there...
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Old 10-07-2006, 03:48 PM   #60
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I caught an article in the Manch Express paper that the ZBA has granted 3 variances for two 3 story buildings housing 32 condos with underground parking on Elm Street for the lot across from Brady Sullivan Tower (the tall white building, formerly the NH Insurance building). The lot is currently just a surface parking lot. Obviously I'd like to see taller buildings, but it should be a vast improvement from whats there.

Also, the ZBA denied Brady Sullivan's application to place 4 large gold-lettered "Brady Sullivan Plaza" signs on top of each side of the 20 story high rise they recently bought. I'm guessing this has less to do with the signs themselves, and more to do with unease about the city becoming Brady Sullivan land.
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