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Old 01-12-2007, 06:24 PM   #21
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That quote perplexes me to no end. Have these people not even seen these plans??! If Harvard did nothing but build one of those bike paths the area would be so much better than it is now. These parks will add so much to Allston that I have to wonder if these people are just reacting without doing their homework.

Those are the worst.
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Old 01-12-2007, 07:07 PM   #22
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Secretary of State William F. Galvin, who chairs the Historical Commission, said the university's plans to submerge the roadway and build a pedestrian bridge over the Charles appear mainly to benefit the university and not members of the community.
Excuse me, but since when is the job of a private university to build stuff to benefit members of the community? That's the most ridiculous, idiotic quote I've ever heard. The job of Harvard University is to build stuff that helps Harvard University. Galvin is an idiot.
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Old 01-12-2007, 07:37 PM   #23
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Galvin got his name in the paper, that's all this is about. How many people even know he is the Secretary of State or that we even have a Secretary of State. He'll now work out a "compromise' and be a hero of the common man. This is standard for Mass politicians.
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Old 01-13-2007, 03:11 AM   #24
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Benefits of decking

For all those haters who wont want to deck SFR...an article I found from today's ArchNewsNow.com:

GUEST QUARTER: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Benefiting from a Cover Up

Cities reap rewards for decking highways with parks

By PETER HARNIK and BEN WELLE

U.S. cities are increasingly putting freeway segments underground and covering them with parkland. Whether called a lid, deck, bridge or tunnel, there are already some 20 highway parks in the country, several under construction ? most notably, the Rose Kennedy Greenway park atop Boston?s Big Dig ? and at least a dozen more in the planning pipeline. As urban auto impacts become less welcome, these decks have moved from the novel to the expected. Despite the sometimes considerable cost ? as much as $500 per square foot ? they are no longer classified as porkbarrel. They?ve been redefined as amenity investment with high economic payback.

It wasn?t until the 1970s construction of Seattle?s Freeway Park atop a downtown section of Interstate 5 that the ?deck-the-freeway? concept began getting serious attention ? opening as it did in time for the Bicentennial. Since then, there have been many more deckings. Phoenix, for instance, put 10-acre Hance Park over the Papago Freeway, uniting uptown and downtown and providing open space adjacent to the city?s central library, while Duluth, Minnesota, put in place three different deck parks over Interstate 35 to bridge the divide the road created between the city and the Lake Superior waterfront. More recently, New Jersey placed innovative freeway parks in Trenton and Atlantic City.

A study carried out by the Trust for Public Land?s Center for City Park Excellence found that the average size of freeway parks in the U.S. is about nine acres, and that, on average, each one covers 1,620 linear feet of highway.

While construction costs for deck parks can be wincingly high, there is also an upside: The land itself is generally free, made available as air rights by state transportation agencies. In center-city locations, this can amount to a multimillion-dollar gift. Land near the Santa Ana Freeway by Los Angeles City Hall, for instance, goes for between $2 million and $3 million an acre. In near-downtown San Diego by Balboa Park, an acre is worth up to $13 million.

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

Regardless of cost, the actual force driving the trend is the opportunity for private development and redevelopment around the parks. In Trenton, for instance, the New Jersey Department of Transportation spent $150 million on the new 6.5-acre Riverwalk deck over U.S. 29, linking the city to the Delaware River. In response, there was a significant spike in prices of nearby property. One lot, worth $120,000 pre-construction, was developed with six housing units that sold for $200,000 each. The park?s existence also helped recruit a new 82-unit market rate residential building.

Projects where freeways are already below grade are much more feasible than others, and there are four particularly high-prospect opportunities in major downtowns. In St. Louis, one of Mayor Francis Slay?s top priorities is the ?three-block solution,? a plan to cover a portion of I-70 between center city and the Gateway Arch so that visitors to the Arch ? there are about 3 million a year ? can get into downtown St. Louis easily, while making it easier for those downtown to reach the Arch and Mississippi waterfront. An early rough estimate put the cost at a minimum of $40 million.

Cincinnati faces a similar situation. An interstate highway, Fort Washington Way, blocks downtown from the Ohio River and the city?s two new sports stadiums. However, there the political will has not yet solidified. Cincinnati had an opportunity to construct a five-block-long park deck during a recent reconstruction (and road narrowing), but opted not to because of cost. As a compromise, the new Fort Washington Way was equipped with $10 million worth of steel pilings capable of supporting a future park. (Adding the park deck is estimated to cost $46 million.)

Dallas, on the other hand, is fired up about the opportunity of building a park over a stretch of the Woodall-Rodgers Freeway. The freeway separates the city?s downtown and arts district from the Uptown neighborhood, and a three-block park cover is seen as both improving the urban form and opening up new opportunities for development. An existing trolley line would run through the park, and condominium towers are expected to flank it on both sides. The park?s price tag is estimated at more than $60 million, but boosters are seeking to raise one-third of that from private sources.

Downtown interests in San Diego are in the early stages of evaluating decking a few blocks of I-5 so as to link with Balboa Park. The city is in the midst of an unprecedented center city residential construction boom, and the highway presents a major barrier for the thousands of apartment dwellers who have little access to green space.

PAYING THE WAY

Despite the cost of a park deck, there are numerous sources of local, state and federal funds to cobble together, particularly if an analysis shows that associated development will generate significantly more tax revenue. One direct approach is to create a tax increment financing district, whereby future increased tax revenue is used to pay back the costs of the deck park. (Chicago used a TIF as partial funding for Millennium Park, which was built over railroad tracks.)

Other local funding sources include general public works capital funds, revenue from another form of a special tax district, or municipal bonds. (Seattle?s ?Forward Thrust? bond paid 20 percent of the cost of Freeway Park.) Often the deck superstructure is paid for by the federal government while actual park development is financed by the city. Phoenix, for instance, spent $5 million landscaping Hance Park.

On the federal level, several decks were built using the Transportation Department?s Interstate Construction Program, but that no longer exists. At present, a state can use National Highway System or Surface Transportation Program funds (although only at the time of road construction, not as an after-the-fact retrofit). The Transportation Enhancement program conceivably could be used if the project provides pedestrian and bicycle facilities and landscaping and scenic beautification. In addition, while the Community Development Block Grant program has shrunk since Seattle used it for Freeway Park in the 1970s, it is still available.

It may also be possible to tap into state transportation funding. The Trenton project involved reconstruction of a New Jersey highway, and the state transportation department paid for it. In Duluth, the Minnesota Department of Transportation contributed 10 percent of the cost.

Private funding can play a role, too. In Cincinnati, 20 percent of the narrowing of Fort Washington Way was financed through private dollars, including $250,000 from the Cincinnati Bengals.

The real key to a successful highway park deck is the economic spinoff that?s generated. A project needs to show its potential impact as a redevelopment tool for surrounding real estate. Only then will the rate of return give both public and private funding sources a sound idea of the value of the investment.

Many years ago, urbanist and public intellectual Lewis Mumford said, ?Forget the damned motor car and build the cities for lovers and friends.? Building parks over freeways doesn?t forget the automobile, but if done right, it offers some help to lovers and friends. That?s a combination that could make political leaders happy.

Peter Harnik is director of the Center for City Park Excellence of the Trust for Public Land, and author of Inside City Parks. Ben Welle is a program assistant with the Center.
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Old 01-13-2007, 07:33 AM   #25
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Decking over Soldier's Field Road is a great idea. I think Galvin's point is just that it's publicly owned land, and therefore planning for it has to involve a public process. Asking who wlll pay for this improvement is a legitimate question.
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Old 01-14-2007, 12:13 PM   #26
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..didn't know the K-mart closed. Too bad

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Globe
Residents on edge as Harvard moves toward Expansion

By Kathleen Burge, Globe Staff | January 14, 2007

In the decade since Harvard University began buying pieces of land in North Allston , a small cluster of streets blocked off from the rest of the city by the Massachusetts Turnpike, the neighborhood has begun to change in subtle ways.

Two stores that residents used to walk to in the Brighton Mills Shopping Center -- Kmart and OfficeMax -- closed last year after Harvard bought the plaza. Residents also fret about losing a pet store and other local shops.

But mainly, residents say, an air of anxiety hangs over the neighborhood as Harvard embarks on plans to add millions of square feet of buildings devoted to science, the arts, and professional schools across the Charles River from its Cambridge home.

Last week, the university sought to answer some of the questions, releasing a master plan that calls for a teeming new public square, academic facilities, retail stores, and student housing. The university also disclosed that it envisions putting 20 acres of Soldiers Field Road underground and replacing surface roadway s with tree-lined promenades.

Clearly aware of their neighbors' concerns, the university said in its document that the expansion is in part "for Allston, and by extension for Boston, intertwining campus and community and enabling both to respond to the prospects of the coming century in an urban and urbane setting."

But many residents remained worried. "I think the air of uncertainty still exists," Harry Mattison, a 12-year resident of North Allston, said after reviewing the master plan.

Over the past decade, Harvard has purchased dozens of properties in Allston, now owning more land in Boston than it does in Cambridge. Residents said they have been frustrated by learning about Harvard's plans bit by bit, without a chance to see the school's larger plans for their neighborhood.

Especially concerned are residents of North Allston, a fistful of land generally bordered by the Massachusetts Turnpike and the Charles River. Many watching Harvard's plans live in a residential area of small streets and two- and three-story houses.

"Yes, there are some transient residents here, but this particular neighborhood does have a very long-standing, very stable community," said Ronni Komarow , who has lived in North Allston for 15 years.

"Because it's a small little pocket, people know each other. You see the same people all the time."

Some worry that their streets will be flooded with cars of employees at the school's proposed art center, whose plans create only 10 new parking spaces. And they fear that Harvard will erect tall buildings that will tower over their neighborhood.

"To have people standing 125 feet over us looking directly into our backyards is a big issue," said Jon Holmes , a North Allston resident.

Harvard will provide other parking spaces for the center in a lot across the street, as well as in other Harvard-owned lots in Allston, said Daron Manoogian , a spokesman for the art museum, in response to the parking concerns.

Residents have also begun discussing ways Harvard could compensate the community for the inconveniences of its planned construction projects. Some have suggested creating community education programs.

"This has always been a blue-collar neighborhood with grass-roots types of residents," said Raymond Mellone , president of the Harvard-Allston Task Force , a group that has been monitoring Harvard's development plans. "With the advent of a world-class institution, we don't want to lose the opportunities for people to attain middle-class status."

After Harvard bought the Brighton Mills shopping center and many of those businesses closed, neighbors now find themselves driving more to Watertown or elsewhere to shop.

They are frustrated that much of the shopping center, like other pieces of property that Harvard has bought, remains empty.

"It's an eyesore and a blight," Holmes said. Harvard officials have said they plan to address the problem by leasing out the buildings for five or 10 years until the school is ready to use the space.

Kathleen Burge can be reached at kburge@globe.com.
? Copyright 2007 Globe Newspaper Company.
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Old 01-14-2007, 05:58 PM   #27
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And czsz, where'd you disappear to? You've been MIA from here and WiredNY for quite some time now..
Busy, I guess. I don't think I've ever posted on this board before, actually. And I've been shifting away from WiredNY since I'm most likely moving back to MA (Cambridge, specifically).
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Old 01-14-2007, 08:23 PM   #28
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Ah, ok. I couldn't remember if you ever did post here, but I knew you had some sort of ties to Boston.

Oh, and by the way - PATS WIN!!
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Old 01-23-2007, 11:59 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by The Globe
Harvard discusses moving researchers


A shift to Allston from Longwood
By Marcella Bombardieri and Thomas C. Palmer Jr., Globe Staff | January 23, 2007

Several influential department heads at Harvard Medical School are discussing the possibility of moving hundreds of researchers and staff from the Longwood medical area to Harvard's emerging campus in Allston.

The proposal under discussion, though still in very preliminary stages, could shift nearly half of the people now occupying the iconic quadrangle at the heart of the medical school -- up to 70 professors and 500 to 700 staff members -- to a new 1-million-square-feet building in Allston.

The talks suggest that Allston, viewed in the past by some of Harvard's faculty as a backwater, is emerging as a more desirable address. And some medical school faculty are intrigued by the possibility of being closer to a cutting-edge science complex planned for Allston as well as opportunities for collaboration with engineers, physicists, chemists, and mathematicians who will be working there.

But taking hundreds of Harvard personnel out of the Longwood medical area is likely to be controversial. Development of the area, which includes leading hospitals, labs, and medical facilities, began a century ago when the medical school opened on Longwood Avenue.

The move under discussion would shift the medical school's basic science researchers -- those examining the building blocks of life such as cells and genes -- to Allston, but not those studying drugs or medical devices, which frequently require clinical trials on humans, according to a Harvard official with knowledge of Allston planning.

Classroom instruction and the school's headquarters would probably remain in the Longwood medical area. The medical school has thousands of other affiliated faculty, but they are based at Harvard teaching hospitals.

Some professors at the medical school believe the 100-year-old quad has become outmoded for cutting-edge laboratories and would like to start afresh in Allston.

Harvard professors and administrators would not discuss details, saying the idea is at a very early, speculative stage. It was not included in the master plan that Harvard submitted to the City of Boston earlier this month. The idea is unlikely to move forward before the arrival of a new dean for the medical school, expected later this year. Any proposal would require several approvals, including from Harvard's governing board, known as the Corporation, and from the city.

But Dr. Steven E. Hyman , the provost, said he was pleased to see faculty members discussing ways they could benefit from Harvard's land in Allston.

"What the medical school is doing is engaging in healthy discussion," he said, noting that the full medical faculty had not yet discussed the idea. "They may decide they want to move something or expand into Allston, and they may decide it's better to keep everyone closer to the hospitals."

Harvard has a historic opportunity to remake itself as it stretches out into more than 200 acres in Allston that it acquired piecemeal over many years. Science will be a major focus for the new campus, beginning with an expansive science complex on Western Avenue, which Harvard plans to begin building this year. The schools of education and public health are also expected to move to Allston.

Some of Harvard's wealthier, more prominent schools have resisted the idea of moving to Allston. The law school's faculty voted against the idea several years ago. But the vast space affords opportunities for creativity, Hyman said. And some of the most exciting work being done in science is on the borders between fields such as biology and engineering.

Harvard is considering its first universitywide department, which would be focused on stem cell biology and bring together scientists from several disciplines.

"The good news for Harvard is that diverse faculties are now taking into consideration the potential opportunities in Allston and thinking in terms of potential new facilities, but more importantly, potential new collaborations," Hyman said.

If the medical school's basic biology researchers vacated the Longwood area, the school might use the space to expand research in a burgeoning area of science called translational research, which tries to adapt basic science discoveries for medical treatments. Harvard could also lease the space to the hospitals or use it for additional classrooms and offices, according to the Harvard official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The medical school's original Longwood campus, opened in 1906, has been renovated numerous times, but is much more difficult to adapt to the high-tech needs of some modern labs, the official said. The imposing white marble complex, built with money from the Rockefellers and J.P. Morgan, was at the time the most expensive and largest medical facility in the country.

Harvard has expanded its presence in the area as recently as three years ago, when it opened a $260 million tower across Longwood Avenue from the original campus.

Harvard officials expect that some professors and hospital administrators would strongly oppose the move, because it could be seen as a blow to the cohesive medical community in Longwood, and because it would be unwieldy for the medical school to straddle two parts of the city.

Dr. Gary Gottlieb , president of Brigham and Women's Hospital, said it was too early to comment on a specific plan but said the Harvard teaching hospital was open to any changes that are in the best interests of scientific advancement.

"To try to bring people with collaborative interests together to build more for Boston and for the world is very important," he said. "We want to make sure our researchers thrive, whether it is right across Shattuck Street or 2 miles away in Allston."

Marcella Bombardieri can be reached at bombardieri@ globe.com.
? Copyright 2007 Globe Newspaper Company.
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Old 01-23-2007, 05:07 PM   #30
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I think that, for the sake of LMA, Harvard should keep its medical school there and put the money that would've been used to move half the faculty into building a underground, heavy rail urban ring to connect the three campuses.
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Old 01-28-2007, 04:45 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by The Globe
Residents seek details of Harvard development plans

By Billy Baker, Globe Correspondent | January 28, 2007

They wore their demands on their chests: "Harvard, You Can Do Better" and "Our River, Not Your Moat."

North Allston residents, many bearing the slogan stickers, packed the auditorium of the Honan-Allston Branch Library Wednesday night to hear Harvard University present an overview of its 50-year plan to extend its campus into their community.

The meeting was the first public dialogue between the community and the university since Harvard submitted its proposal for development on 250 acres of university-owned land in Allston to Boston planning officials earlier this month .

Harvard Business School and the university athletic complex already occupy much of the land on the north and east sides of North Allston, a peninsula that is bordered by the Charles River and the Massachusetts Turnpike. Most of North Allston's residential streets are located to the south and west, and residents expressed concern that the proposed expansion -- which will extend the campus west and south and abut many residential neighborhoods -- will increase traffic, noise, and congestion and create parking problems.

One recurrent theme from residents was that the Harvard plan lacked enough detail to allow for a proper understanding of what the university has planned for its property.

Harvard officials acknowledged that their proposal was vague in many areas, but explained that this was because the university was unsure of its long-term academic needs and wanted to seek community input before developing a more specific plan. Harvard said it plans to focus its initial efforts on developing transportation, open space, and infrastructure -- including new roads and a proposal to place 20 acres of Soldiers Field Road underground to create a tree-lined promenade along the Charles River -- to provide the framework for future building projects.

For many, this explanation was not good enough.

"We need to know exactly what they want to do and when they plan to do it," said Representative Michael Moran , who represents most of North Allston. "My district also includes Boston College, and I can tell you everything they plan to do over the next 15 years. We don't have anything near that specificity with Harvard. These things need to be worked out before they put a shovel in the ground."

While most of Harvard's proposal is for future use, the university is hoping to begin construction on two major buildings -- a 695,000-square-foot science complex on Western Avenue and a 135,000-square-foot art center near Barry's Corner -- as early as this summer. Due to time constraints, presentations on the two facilities were postponed Wednesday night and will be the focus of a meeting on Feb. 12.

Both projects have been submitted to the Boston Redevelopment Authority for review, and many residents expressed concern that these projects are being rushed and will dictate the scope and density of what is to come. Most of the nearly 200 people in attendance applauded when one resident suggested hiring legal counsel to halt the projects.

John Bruno , a member of the Allston community task force that has been monitoring Harvard's expansion plans, said the growth is inevitable and the community and the university need to strike a balance that is beneficial to both.

"Something is going to happen with this property," Bruno said. "We have to make sure it's the right thing. "

Details of the Harvard proposal are available at allston.harvard.edu.

The BRA encourages residents to submit written comments and concerns to gerald.autler.BRA@cityofboston.gov by Feb. 16.

Billy Baker can be reached at ciweek@globe.com.
? Copyright 2007 Globe Newspaper Company.
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Old 01-29-2007, 12:37 AM   #32
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At first I thought this was just another case of the NIBYs but they seem to make a good point. Harvard shouldn't just walk right in and start building, especially in this day and age where people know they can make their voices heard.
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Old 01-29-2007, 04:50 PM   #33
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Disagree- Harvard's growth shouldn't be chained to a multi-decade, specific plan. The locals (who will probably be more transient than the university anyway) will see details for each proposed segment, but Harvard shouldn't have to nail down every detail at this point. Universities need to grow and adapt with the times; for Harvard to plan an athletic field when it may someday need a lab would be to restrict the creative potential of one of the city's most dynamic entities.
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Old 02-06-2007, 09:25 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by The Globe
Harvard's Allston expansion plan turning a corner?


Residents mull university's offer to relocate housing complex; would pave way for drab intersection's rehab

By Kristen Green, Globe Correspondent | February 3, 2007

Can Harvard University copy the lively mix of street, student, and commercial life in Harvard Square to invigorate a nondescript intersection in Allston?

Included in the school's ambitious, multiyear plan to expand its campus across the Charles River is a proposal to turn a shabby intersection in this section of Boston into a hub of activity that will become a gateway to Harvard's athletic and cultural facilities. Harvard's vision for Barry's Corner, where Western Avenue and North Harvard Street meet, includes an arts center with a dramatic glass-roofed theater, fountain, and residential buildings with ground-floor cafes and shops.

"It's an opportunity to change the landscape," said Ray Mellone, chairman of a community task force on the Harvard expansion. Right now, Mellone noted, the intersection is "nothing to brag about" -- the unattractive home to a couple of gas stations, a 7-Eleven, and some Harvard back-office operations.

But to accomplish its goal, Harvard must acquire a 35-year-old affordable apartment complex that sits just off the intersection. The 213-unit Charlesview Apartments are at the tip of a pie-shaped wedge of land that stretches back toward the river and Cambridge. Harvard's bold 50-year master plan for Allston, which it unveiled last month, includes drawings that show several arts and culture buildings where the complex now sits.

The university has tried to buy the property for years, and most recently offered to relocate Charlesview further down Western Avenue, to property it owns at the Brighton Mills Shopping Center , and on a small riverfront site across the street. Harvard also offered an undisclosed sum of money to rebuild the complex. As proposed, the rebuild would have up to 400 units, one-quarter of which would be sold as market-rate condos. The apartments would be rented at different affordability levels, and most would be larger and would have such amenities as washers and driers, said Felicia Jacques of The Community Builders Inc., which is representing the Charlesview board in negotiations.

This offer is the "most significant" Harvard has made to date, Jacques said. The board is still trying to determine if the offer is "viable," she said. "There's nothing definitive yet," said Rabbi Abraham Halbfinger, board chairman.

But tenants are split. Those who oppose the complex's relocation said the university is walking over them in a quest to recreate Harvard Square. Lucia Velasquez, president of the Charlesview Tenants' Association, which represents 130 residents, said Harvard officials and Charlesview's board have refused to answer important questions about the new apartments. "They have a lot of land. Why do they have to build on top of us?" she said.

But Raisa Shapiro is looking forward to moving. A Charlesview tenant for 16 years, she has a long list of complaints about the current complex, including a bedroom wall that gets wet when it rains, mice in her kitchen, and walls and ceilings that crumble "like sandcastles on the beach." Harvard's offer of relocation, she said, is a boon. "We got lucky," she said. "I don't understand why people don't feel the same way."

Kathy Spiegelman , Harvard's chief planner for the campus expansion, said the university has been negotiating directly with the board, which owns the complex, and recognizes that process has frustrated some residents. Harvard has marketed the redevelopment of the area, and in particular of Barry's Corner, as benefiting the Allston neighborhood and the university.

Spiegelman also said the university isn't looking to copy Harvard Square, and the widely trafficked Cambridge nexus, with its public transit services, will remain the hub of student activity. Barry's Corner, she said, "will be its own commercial center, not imitating something that already exists."

For nearly two decades Harvard has quietly assembled more than 200 acres in Allston to expand its campus. The university plans to build academic and athletic facilities and student housing over the next 20 years, and the asphalt parking lots and industrial yard in the neighborhood would become a secondary campus of tree-lined streets, open spaces, and museums. Planning is already underway to rebuild a Verizon warehouse on Western Avenue as the Harvard University Art Museum art center, which will house the university's modern art and store the collection of the Fogg Art Museum while that facility is renovated.

Many in Allston are also concerned about what they say is a lack of detail in Harvard's plans. But as for Barry's Corner, Mellone, the task force chairman, said the plans have the potential to be transformative. "With the changes proposed, it stands to make a great big visual improvement one way or the other," he said.
? Copyright 2007 Globe Newspaper Company.
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Old 02-06-2007, 09:35 AM   #35
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I love how the Allston 'residents' are so concerned that Harvard will be developing this area. I mean ANYTHING is better than what is currently there. The only people who should be legitimately concerned are the Charlesview tenants, but from the article it seems that they will be well taken care of.
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Old 02-06-2007, 11:08 AM   #36
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The residents who lost their strip mall aren't especially happy, either. Hopefully Harvard will at least leave the supermarket there.
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Old 02-06-2007, 08:31 PM   #37
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Planning is already underway to rebuild a Verizon warehouse on Western Avenue as the Harvard University Art Museum art center, which will house the university's modern art and store the collection of the Fogg Art Museum while that facility is renovated.
Bet the art thieves are salivating. Time to say goodbye to the Van Gogh with green eyes?
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Old 02-07-2007, 10:20 AM   #38
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Disagree- Harvard's growth shouldn't be chained to a multi-decade, specific plan. The locals (who will probably be more transient than the university anyway) will see details for each proposed segment, but Harvard shouldn't have to nail down every detail at this point. Universities need to grow and adapt with the times; for Harvard to plan an athletic field when it may someday need a lab would be to restrict the creative potential of one of the city's most dynamic entities.
And if Harvard had presented a plan with great detail, then many of these residents would be complaining, and bitterly too, about Harvard having gone ahead and made design and development decisions without first having met or talked with them.
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Old 02-07-2007, 03:03 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by czsz
Disagree- Harvard's growth shouldn't be chained to a multi-decade, specific plan. The locals (who will probably be more transient than the university anyway) will see details for each proposed segment, but Harvard shouldn't have to nail down every detail at this point. Universities need to grow and adapt with the times; for Harvard to plan an athletic field when it may someday need a lab would be to restrict the creative potential of one of the city's most dynamic entities.
And if Harvard had presented a plan with great detail, then many of these residents would be complaining, and bitterly too, about Harvard having gone ahead and made design and development decisions without first having met or talked with them.
Harvard could build roads of gold and theyd still complain that the sun was reflected
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Old 02-13-2007, 11:26 AM   #40
stellarfun
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Dunkin Donuts is a local landmark!?

Without seeing the full text of the actual letter, there seems to be a bit of inherent contradiction; e.g., build a world class museum but make it small.

From the Harvard Crimson
Quote:
Officials Face Concerns Over Allston Expansion

Residents fear loss of local landmarks due to proposed art museum
Published On 2/13/2007 3:52:09 AM

By LAURA A. MOORE
Crimson Staff Writer

Harvard officials defended their plans for the campus expansion into Allston at a meeting last night, facing an onslaught of complaints from residents?ranging from what to do with a local Dunkin? Donuts to how to sort out residential concerns about privacy and traffic during construction.

The meeting?s discussions, which took place at St. Anthony?s School in Allston, centered on the University?s plan to erect an art museum at the intersection of North Harvard Street and Western Avenue?known to residents as Barry?s Corner.

If the plan is approved by the Boston Redevelopment Authority?the agency that oversees the city?s construction and renewal projects?construction could begin as early as this summer.

But late last month, the Allston residents who sit on the Harvard-Allston Task Force submitted comments to the agency stating that the museum project should not be approved in its current form.

The letter cited several concerns, particularly the size of the museum?s location, to explain why the task force sought to delay approval of the project.

?Harvard has the resources of land, money, and art to build a world-class museum in Allston,? the members wrote in the letter. ?Barry?s Corner and Boston should settle for nothing less.?

But Harvard University Art Museums Director Thomas W. Lentz said the art museum would be beneficial for the community as well as the University.

?In this case, we think that academic and public interest are not at all incompatible,? he said. ?We fully intend to be a welcoming presence here?we want to be a good neighbor in Allston.?

According to Lentz, the art museum would be equally dedicated to public use, artwork storage, and office and research spaces for Harvard faculty.

He added that coordinated visits with local schools and workshops in print-making and photography would also benefit the community.

Residents nevertheless still questioned the choice for the museum?s location.

?It appears that this is a great-looking building, but it?s just too big for the site you?re looking to build it on,? said Allston resident Paul Alford.

But another resident, Tim McHale, said that for Harvard?s expansion into Allston to succeed, individuals on both sides need to keep an open mind.

?We have to look out for each other,? he said. ?We want you to succeed because your success is our success, and I think our success is your success.?
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