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Old 01-16-2007, 09:20 PM   #21
DudeUrSistersHot
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Originally Posted by budman3
[...]
kmp insinuated that I: 1. Have a dead-end job, and 2. Plan at working there the rest of my life. I'm saying that first of all, I don't plan on working there for the rest of my life, and second, it is not a dead-end job. It is a job at a high-growth high-profit company that compensates extremely well. A job at which, by my mid twenties, I could be making over $100,000 per year with bonus. However, retail is really not my thing.

I have friends that go to Bridgewater State and UMass, and they are by no means bad schools. The truth is, it's more about who you know and your ability to sell yourself that determines how much you make in life. I personally know that I would not make a dollar less if I went to either of those schools instead of Bentley. I'm going to Bentley for the experience and the education, and the fact that it's at the forefront of business. Bridgewater and UMass won't give me the same experience that I will get at Bentley, although the education might be perfectly fine. Personally, I got close to perfect SAT scores (highest in my school) and I also got that scholarship, although my GPA is a bit low.

When I have an opinion, I say it. It may be a stereotype, a generalization, a cliche, whatever you want to call it. But that's just my nature. You may disagree with it, but more often than not it provokes more discussion about the subject.
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Old 01-16-2007, 09:49 PM   #22
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For those of you not familiar with Wood Island Park, it was designed by Fredrick Law Olmsted and was the largest park in Boston until it met it's end beneath the bulldozer's blade..
I don't think it was bigger than Franklin Park (also by Olmsted).
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Old 01-16-2007, 11:05 PM   #23
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I've had enough

You guys are great!
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Old 01-16-2007, 11:11 PM   #24
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I remember one summer semester I wanted to get out of econ101 on the cheap so I enrolled at Mass Bay over in Wellesley. THe professor was great. We actually had the same text book as ec101 at BU did (the econ program coincidentally ranked 6th or 7th in the country). After handing out the syllabus he wanted to set forth some ground rules and gauge everyone's understanding of certain math concepts. He goes:
"Now, before I go any further, I want to make sure that everyone here understands how to read a graph. Can everyone read a graph? If you can't read a graph raise your hand."
At which point, a pregnant 19-20 year old (piece of ass) raises her hand and says (verbatim, I'll never forget it)

"I've heard OF them. But no, I can't read them."

Therein lies the problem with schools like Bridgewater State. I'd still go to a school Bridgewater State. I just wouldn't expect Post Office Square Joe Blow to hire me. He'll automatically assume my high school attention span was similar to that of the piece of ass 19 year old from MassBay.

I'd hire anybody from any school if they showed me diligence... as long as they partied in school and got (most) of it out of their system by 25.
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Old 01-17-2007, 09:48 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by bosdevelopment
I remember one summer semester I wanted to get out of econ101 on the cheap so I enrolled at Mass Bay over in Wellesley. THe professor was great. We actually had the same text book as ec101 at BU did (the econ program coincidentally ranked 6th or 7th in the country). After handing out the syllabus he wanted to set forth some ground rules and gauge everyone's understanding of certain math concepts. He goes:
"Now, before I go any further, I want to make sure that everyone here understands how to read a graph. Can everyone read a graph? If you can't read a graph raise your hand."
At which point, a pregnant 19-20 year old (piece of ass) raises her hand and says (verbatim, I'll never forget it)

"I've heard OF them. But no, I can't read them."

Therein lies the problem with schools like Bridgewater State. I'd still go to a school Bridgewater State. I just wouldn't expect Post Office Square Joe Blow to hire me. He'll automatically assume my high school attention span was similar to that of the piece of ass 19 year old from MassBay.

I'd hire anybody from any school if they showed me diligence... as long as they partied in school and got (most) of it out of their system by 25.
Congratulations, you're 78% snobby and 22% piously self-righteous.
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Old 01-17-2007, 09:56 AM   #26
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^

Did you read my post?
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Old 01-17-2007, 10:15 AM   #27
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I don't see what it has to do with Portside at Pier One.
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Old 01-17-2007, 10:20 AM   #28
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I think that with all of the 'new money' moving in to Eastie, they will be able to use their financial resources to more effectively or at least hire more lawyers to combat Logan Airport and other maladies of that area.
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Old 01-17-2007, 10:34 AM   #29
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nobody cares

"78% snobby and 22% piously self-righteous"...AMEN. Nobody wants to hear anecdotes from econ 101, or who a 17 year old would hire when he turns 25 and is running the world. Leave the college debates, and "piece of ass" comments for websites like myspace and facebook. Enough already.
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Old 01-17-2007, 11:45 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by jass
Id hope theyd be built out of reinforced concrete to help prevent airplane noise indoors.
This is a good point. The amount of noise you're able to block with concrete is amazing.
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:19 PM   #31
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Re: nobody cares

Quote:
Originally Posted by sidewalks
"78% snobby and 22% piously self-righteous"...AMEN. Nobody wants to hear anecdotes from econ 101, or who a 17 year old would hire when he turns 25 and is running the world. Leave the college debates, and "piece of ass" comments for websites like myspace and facebook. Enough already.
um, bosdev is a bit older than 17...
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Old 01-17-2007, 05:28 PM   #32
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[quote="Ron Newman"]
Quote:
I don't think it was bigger than Franklin Park (also by Olmsted).
Of course -- I stand corrected...

I need to consult my former colleague Cynthia Zaitzevsky's excellent book, Frederick Law Olmsted and the Boston Park System for the correct info...Wood Island was an active park, whereas Franklin Park was designed as a natural landscape with 200 acres of forest, etc -- this may be the distinction, but I'm not sure...
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Old 06-01-2007, 07:54 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Globe
E. Boston waterfront project stalls
Massport, companies dispute reasons for setback at Pier One

By Kimberly Blanton, Globe Staff | June 1, 2007

Builders of a $275 million residential and retail complex on East Boston's waterfront unexpectedly delayed construction last month, a setback to a project critical to the neighborhood's economic future.

Roseland Property Co. and Lennar Corp. stopped work on Portside at Pier One because of cost increases and softness in local real estate, according to Massachusetts Port Authority, which owns the property.

"The developer has requested an extension before the next phase of the construction project," Anthony Guerriero, Massport's East Boston liaison, wrote in a memo Wednesday to the Waterfront Development Advisory Council, a neighborhood group.

Massport, which is leasing the site to the developers, granted the companies 60 days to begin the next phase of construction, which had been scheduled for last month .

A Lennar official disputed Massport's explanation , and said construction on the first residential building, with 368 condos and 177 apartments, is scheduled to resume in late summer or early fall.

"We haven't put the brakes on this because of the market," said Jed Lawry, director of asset management for Lennar Urban Northeast, the unit overseeing the condo portion of the project. "We're on the site. We're mobilizing to get teams to start bringing that building up ."

Roseland spokeswoman Nancy Sterling said the project was delayed because the developers recently switched general contractors and, to cut costs, are requiring subcontractors to submit new bids for parts of the project.

"That is taking longer than we thought," Sterling said.

The development has been years in the making and is the most ambitious construction project under way in East Boston, historically an entry point for immigrants to the area. The array of five- and seven-story buildings will include housing , shops, and marina facilities on the waterfront property and a nearby pier, and will have views of downtown Boston. As approved by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, the project includes 58 residential units at affordably priced rates.

More than half of the pier property will be reserved for parks and other public space.

While community members have been worried the project would drive up housing costs, some have also welcomed Portside at Pier One, saying it will revitalize a desolate tract of land and add life to East Boston's economy.

"I'm very, very disappointed" about the delay, said Salvatore LaMattina, a Boston city councilor for East Boston. "We worked too long to get that project started," he said, and "I'm worried that this is not going to happen, and I need this to happen."

The 13-acre site along Marginal Street has already been cleared, including demolition of a hangar-size shed. Yesterday the work site was empty, and 1,048 newly placed pilings were visible through the chain-link fence cordoning off the property.

Developers were about to enter the construction and sale phase at a time when building costs have increased sharply and the once-hot condo market has cooled. Downtown condominium sales decreased 8 percent in the second quarter, compared with a year earlier, though the median condo price increased to 4 percent to $479,000.

Government officials and others involved in the project said the project is running into unforeseen expenses, which they were unable to detail. But they said those problems may require the developers to alter their plans, possibly building fewer units or reducing prices.

LaMattina also said he was told by project participants that another option being looked at would move the project's affordable units to a different site in East Boston, presumably to free up more units at Portside for sale at higher, market prices.

But Sterling said Roseland has no plans to change the residential portion of the project.

Last fall, Roseland took the unusual step of replacing its primary contractor on the project, Skanska USA Building Inc. with Suffolk Construction Co.

"I think we introduce more predictability in that process," said John Fish, chief executive of Suffolk, who blamed rising construction costs for causing the developers "to reevaluate the whole program."

Kerim Evans, vice president of operations for Skanska USA, said his firm was not the source of the cost increases. He was told by Roseland that Suffolk's estimate for the project was "less than 1 percent different than where it was when Skanska priced it," he said. "It's no mystery that the project is over budget."

East Boston activist Mary Ellen Welch is now worried about the fate of the waterfront park portion of the project. "It's a key to the waterfront development," she said. "I hope this doesn't put it in peril."

Kimberly Blanton can be reached at blanton@globe.com.
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Old 06-04-2007, 09:21 PM   #34
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eastie waterfront

I'm curious to know if there are any insiders here with info on this East Pier Boston project? (formerly portside at pier one) I read the 6/1 article from boston.com regarding the stalled status and I'm trying to find out more details on that situation.
Additional side commentary: As a relative newcomer to east boston, it boggles the mind that so much eastie waterfront is undeveloped. If anyone has been to piers park, you know the views from there are jaw dropping, it's a 4 minute tunnel drive to Government center that costs 40 cents for residents (or two T stops on the blue line), and aircraft noise on the waterfront is next to zero because it's tucked inside a runway triangle. In any other city this type of land would be gobbled up and developed like, well... like urban waterfront. Imagine a swath of waterfront with views of downtown Manhattan from across the water and think about how long that would last undeveloped. I'm definitely missing something when it comes to understanding the eastie waterfront.
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Old 06-04-2007, 10:31 PM   #35
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Re: eastie waterfront

Quote:
Originally Posted by beantown-dan
I'm curious to know if there are any insiders here with info on this East Pier Boston project? (formerly portside at pier one) I read the 6/1 article from boston.com regarding the stalled status and I'm trying to find out more details on that situation.
Additional side commentary: As a relative newcomer to east boston, it boggles the mind that so much eastie waterfront is undeveloped. If anyone has been to piers park, you know the views from there are jaw dropping, it's a 4 minute tunnel drive to Government center that costs 40 cents for residents (or two T stops on the blue line), and aircraft noise on the waterfront is next to zero because it's tucked inside a runway triangle. In any other city this type of land would be gobbled up and developed like, well... like urban waterfront. Imagine a swath of waterfront with views of downtown Manhattan from across the water and think about how long that would last undeveloped. I'm definitely missing something when it comes to understanding the eastie waterfront.
Welcome to East Boston, Dan. I've lived here my entire live, and have the same questions. The short answers are poor public policy, malignant land-use by the Massport and their minions, ineffectual political representation before a willfully ignorant and increasingly apathetic electorate, and the requisite graft and cronyism that exist in every working-class neighborhood in Boston (and maybe Massachusetts)...You may want to read up on Gus Serra and Bob Travaglini -- both men managed to profit (politically and personally) by keeping their constituents in dire straits...
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Old 06-05-2007, 10:38 PM   #36
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eastie waterfront

It could well be politics that have prevented the entire East Boston waterfront from being developed and that is unfortunate. When I see the waterfront here, all I see is massive, massive potential. I guess we could create a whole entire topic of separate discussion on the subject of "politics and east boston development."
With that aside and onto the East Pier Project itself, I have posted a brochure that I received in the mail that details the various buildings to be constructed. I'm not entirely sure, but I believe the land building (Lyrata) behind the pier is the first to be constructed:

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Old 08-12-2007, 06:37 PM   #37
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East Pier updates?

Anyone happen to know what came out of this meeting? I haven't been able to find anything since this Boston Globe article...

BUSINESS IN BRIEF
MassPort to give update on stalled E. Boston project
July 17, 2007

THE REGION
Massachusetts Port Authority officials are scheduled to give East Boston residents an update tonight on the troubled East Pier residential and retail project, which got underway this year on the waterfront. Roseland Property Co. and its partner, Lennar Urban Northeast, planned a seven-building, $275 million, 550-unit luxury condo and apartment complex for a 13-acre site at Pier One, but high construction costs and a spotty residential market have caused the developers to reevaluate their options, said Lowell L. Richards III, chief development officer for Massport. "Roseland still desires to proceed with the project," he said, but construction ceased about a week ago. The developer has also made a commitment to build a second phase of the popular nearby public space, Piers Park. (Thomas C. Palmer Jr.)
? Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
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Old 08-25-2007, 08:26 PM   #38
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Notes from the "status" meeting for East Pier

I seem to have found the answer to my own question, which only prompts additional questions...
http://thehubsterblog.blogspot.com/2...r-meeting.html
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Old 08-27-2007, 09:57 AM   #39
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Thanks for the update beantown-dan. This is disappointing. This had to be one of the most promising developments in East Boston. I hope they can figure out the financing to make it happen.
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Old 09-24-2007, 05:40 PM   #40
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Eastie's sizzle fizzles
The next 'hot' housing market has cooled, and, for some, that's OK
By Kristen Green, Globe Correspondent | September 23, 2007


Just two years ago, East Boston was the next "it" location. Waterfront access and skyline views, low housing prices and undiscovered status gave the neighborhood, long home to first-generation immigrants and settled ethnic communities, a certain allure with developers and urban pioneers looking to invest in a future hot spot.

Developers snapped up triple-deckers to remodel and flip, and proposed converting factories into high-end condominiums. An enormous waterfront project with luxury units priced up to $2 million was the talk of the neighborhood. In 2005, condo sales jumped 264 percent.

With the community poised to see the construction of more than 1,000 new luxury apartments and condos, many with breathtaking views of the city's Inner Harbor and downtown, something major was happening in East Boston.

"It was on fire. It was going crazy here," said David Barsky, who bought a house in the neighborhood in 2000 and embarked on an eight-unit remodeling project in 2006.

Then, as fast as the boom started, it was over. In 2006, the real estate market statewide softened. As extreme as it was during the boom, East Boston's condo market was way out front during the bust: Sales here fell 30 percent in 2006, compared to a 10 percent decline citywide. And so far this year, condo sales in East Boston are down nearly 18 percent, but are flat citywide.

Once-imminent luxury condos are suddenly on the back burner. Earlier this year, work on the massive East Pier, a 550-unit luxury condominium and apartment complex, stalled just months after it began. The developers now intend to begin building an apartment building this fall, rather than the condos that were initially planned to go first.

Meanwhile, another waterfront development, Clippership Wharf, where 400 condos were proposed, is also going to be built as an apartment complex.

The neighborhood's real estate appeal seemed to fade as fast as it exploded.

"I don't think it's considered the up-and-coming neighborhood that it was anymore," said John A. Keith, who runs the Boston Real Estate Blog.

James Zarrella, a real estate agent for Coldwell Banker who owns more than 80 units in East Boston, said the publicity around waterfront developments such as East Pier helped get people to think differently about East Boston. The upscale project, estimated at $275 million, could usher in other changes common in a gentrifying neighborhood - high-end restaurants, boutiques, and better services, he said.

But with the housing market slowdown, and the stalling of major developments that would have dramatically altered the landscape, East Boston is "where we were five or six years ago. We're in a day-by-day market," Zarrella said. "Not everybody is pounding the neighborhood to get over here and live. There just isn't that demand to be here."

People who recently converted condos are now offering steep discounts or renting them out; in some cases, lenders took over the properties, he said.

Barsky, who estimated he stood to make as much as $1 million restoring a huge Victorian, was unable to complete renovation before the market cooled. He ran out of money, sold it to someone with deeper pockets, and lost $500,000, including his house.

Now he is working with another developer to try to get eight newly constructed condo units on Cottage Street sold before winter hits. He's worried the market could decline even more, and the condos, which were originally going to go on the market for the high $300,000s or low $400,000s, have already been marked down to the low $300,000s.

But to others, the stalling market may have provided a much-needed breather for East Boston, and helped preserve some of the unique flavor of the neighborhood that made it so appealing, including its demographic mix of races and ethnic businesses.

Longtime East Boston realtor Tony Giacalone, owner of Tony's Realty, said the major benefit residents expect from the East Pier project was the waterfront access it would provide. He said he has never heard anyone talking about actually buying a unit in the development.

"A lot of people would be just as happy if that were turned into a park," Giacalone said, contending the projected unit prices are too high for the neighborhood.

He said the boast that East Boston was the next hot neighborhood was "based on hype." But that doesn't mean East Boston is dead. The neighborhood has seen marked improvements in recent years - there are more owner-occupants on every block, and they are spending money fixing up their new homes, filling flowerboxes, and adding other touches that brighten the streetscape, he said. Storefronts are full, creating a vibrant urban village.

"There's a steady, gradual gentrification happening," he said.

He said if the proposed waterfront projects had been priced in the same range as, say, the lofts at Porter 156, a beautifully converted warehouse once home to a bra factory, they would have had better prospects in East Boston.

Keith, who runs the real estate blog, predicted the high-end condo market in East Boston is gone because people in Boston won't relocate across the water. "They're not willing to take a chance on a neighborhood if it doesn't have momentum, if it's not seen as up-and-coming, and they're definitely not going to spend $500,000," he said. But he said that's a positive for people who already live in the neighborhood, because it keeps the community affordable for first-time homebuyers and immigrants.

Indeed, as painful as it is to some sellers and recent buyers, the slowdown has helped preserve something of the old character of East Boston.

There isn't a Starbucks in East Boston yet - though one is projected near Maverick Square, which is dotted with doughnut shops, check-cashing businesses, and taco shops.

Barsky sees East Boston as a place of opportunity, with its vinyl-clad triple-deckers waiting to be restored. Just maybe not until the market recovers.

"East Boston is the last bastion of undervalued property in Boston," he said.


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