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Old 12-10-2006, 05:09 PM   #1
palindrome
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A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

I was in my dinning hall today, and saw a copy of the sunday globe and on the cover was an article about campus development at MIT, BU, and i think harvard. Does anyone have this article online, because i can't seem to find it at boston.com

Thanks!
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Old 12-10-2006, 05:12 PM   #2
justin
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The Boston Globe
A building boom on campus
Major projects for area colleges expected to boost landscape, economy
By Marcella Bombardieri, Globe Staff | December 10, 2006
A new residential tower could rise 30 stories over the Back Bay. A sprawling complex would buzz with hundreds of scientists in Allston, and a sleek glass-and-limestone business school would fill out the banks of the Charles.
These projects -- at Berklee College of Music, Harvard University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- are among about two dozen new buildings on the drawing board at universities and colleges in the Boston area.
In the next decade, construction on eight college and university campuses will create thousands of jobs and alter the Boston landscape. The plans -- some recently unveiled, others under construction -- call for building more than 5 million square feet, according to a Globe tally of available figures from the schools. They would cost well over $1.3 billion, a price tag that does not include Harvard's or Boston College's proposals because they would not provide cost estimates.
"Things are changing in our city, and I think changing for the good," said Mayor Thomas M. Menino . Universities "are bringing new energy to this city. The possibilities for development are just untold, you can't even imagine what they are going to be."
Boston-area colleges large and small are taking advantage of their wealth, their rising national reputations, and their expanding research programs to undertake historic levels of growth.
Pop-up GRAPHIC: The expanding campus
They have also been pushed by the city of Boston to house more students on campus and are driven by market forces to improve amenities for students and expand research facilities.
New residence halls would house an additional 6,000 students.
But the university building boom, while alleviating town-gown tension in some areas, has increased it in others.
Some residents worry that high-rise dorms could erode the character of their neighborhoods, and others oppose more development because they say tax-exempt universities already place too much of a burden on the city's budget.
Boston has not seen such a rash of university development since at least the 1960s, said Richard M. Freeland , former president of Northeastern and a historian of higher education. Today, he said, local colleges are thriving to the point that they can finance hundreds of millions of dollars for construction.
BC and MIT are each working on major campus upgrades with at least four new buildings on existing land, for a variety of purposes including housing and research. Harvard is beginning what promises to be a decades-long expansion into Allston, with a focus on science, professional schools, and cultural spaces. Northeastern, Suffolk University , Boston University, Emerson College, and Berklee are building or planning to build new dormitories.
For the most part, they are adding space to house more students on campus, rather than to expand enrollment.
Civic leaders say that while higher education has long been one of Boston's strongest economic sectors, it has become all the more crucial as Boston has lost much of its status as a major corporate headquarters. Gillette, FleetBoston, and John Hancock were bought by out-of-town corporations.
In 2002, the city's major research universities employed 50,750 people, a study found.
The building boom will create thousands of short-term construction jobs and thousands more permanent skilled and unskilled jobs, according to Globe estimates based on formulas developed by Appleseed , a New York-based economic development consultant company that has done similar studies for the Boston Foundation and Harvard.
Colleges' growth also indirectly spawns new businesses, civic leaders say.
MIT's new $210 million cancer research building will house at least 400 biologists, engineers, and their support staff working to develop new drugs and devices.
Harvard's short-term plans include about 1 million square feet of research facilities, which could lead to a steady stream of discoveries and spark the creation of eight to 10 start-up companies each year, according to Appleseed's formulas.
The buildings will give one of the country's most historic cities a more contemporary look, said several architects and urban planners. It will also mean a taller city, since cramped schools are often building up instead of out. BU, Northeastern, Suffolk, and Berklee are all working on towers of at least 22 stories.
Universities are much more likely to commission creative, exciting architecture than private companies, said Ted Landsmark , president of the Boston Architectural College .
In Allston, Harvard intends to transform an industrial and commercial patch of land into a mix of academic buildings, cultural facilities, housing, and green space.
The conceptual drawings for the 695,000-square-foot science complex, by the German firm Behnisch Architects, suggest something glassy and contemporary.
Berklee proposes a high-rise for dormitory space and a theater, with two or three towers at the corner of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue that could revitalize a stretch of Mass. Ave. overlooking the Massachusetts Turnpike, said school officials and other observers.
The various projects will "make the city seem younger and minimize the old-fogey quality Boston sometimes has," said Alex Krieger , a professor at Harvard's Graduate School of Design and a principal in a Cambridge architecture and urban design firm.
But some people do not want the city to feel younger, especially if that means students yelling in the streets and urinating in their bushes on Saturday nights.
Steven Turner , a developer and Beacon Hill resident, is on a community task force evaluating a controversial Suffolk dorm project for a 22-story tower with about 500 beds.
He is worried about more rowdy students moving in and about the shadows and wind the tower would create. He is also concerned about the neighborhood losing its historic and residential feel.
"I understand that it's a life-or-death situation for these colleges," Turner said, referring to their need to grow. "But the city can't let them displace the neighborhoods while they're at it."
City officials say that new residence halls will reduce that danger by getting students onto campuses. Fewer students commuting to schools will alleviate the traffic and parking crunch and will keep housing prices in check, they say.
Councilor at Large Stephen J. Murphy said he thinks the growth of these tax-exempt institutions is starving the city of revenue. He is holding hearings Friday on his proposal to require universities to greatly boost the payments they make in lieu of taxes.
"It's an unmitigated disaster financially for us to have nonprofits, especially educational institutions, expanding within the geographic limits of the city," Murphy said.
Freeland, a visiting professor at Harvard, said the expansion is a boon, not a burden.
"What we are looking at today is a fantastic validation of the vitality of these institutions," he said. "They are the greatest institutional treasure the city has."
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Old 12-10-2006, 05:14 PM   #3
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Here is the link for the globe article on campus development.http://www.boston.com/news/education...oom_on_campus/ I also posted this link on the Berklee expansion thread.
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Old 12-10-2006, 05:14 PM   #4
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Thank you both.
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Old 12-11-2006, 06:33 AM   #5
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All in all, a modest boom.
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Old 10-24-2010, 09:46 PM   #6
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

So, I've spent a considerable amount of time collecting data on post-secondary student enrollment during the past 20-odd years. My goal was to determine how many additional students are now going to school in Boston and how many are now living on- and off-campus. My interest was sparked by two things. One, it seems as though everyone in Boston is against students - the Boston City Council, for one, and residents, for another. Two, Barry Bluestone at Northeastern issued his annual "Greater Boston Housing Report Card" where he concluded that having college students in our neighborhoods are driving up rental prices. (I agree with his conclusion ... but that's getting ahead of myself.)

I was surprised by some of the results of the data. (I used a government website I found, the National Center for Educational Statistics http://nces.ed.gov.)

Below are three images of the data. I thought people might be interested.

Basically, the data shows that total college enrollment is up by (only) 15,000 students since 1990.

Surprisingly, undergraduate enrollment in Boston has actually stayed stagnant since 1990. The entire increase in enrollment is made up of graduate students. (Barry Bluestone found a similar spike in grad school enrollment but he analyzed Greater Boston, not Boston, in his study.)

Undergrads did shift considerably from part-time to full-time enrollment. Part-time enrollment dropped by 15,000 while full-time enrollment increased by 15,000. Again, resulting in a net 0% increase, overall.

There were 10,000 more full-time grad students enrolled in 2008 than in 1990. There were 5,300 more part-time grad students enrolled in 2008 than in 1990.

What I am drawing as a conclusion from this all is that anyone who complains about the pressure put on housing costs (and supply) by students really doesn't have anything to complain about - it's been the way it is today for the past two decades.

The REAL problem, in my opinion, is that the city didn't prepare for the overall increase in people during the past decade, when Boston's population soared by 56,000, from 589,141 to 645,000. Students put some pressure on housing but in reality ALL people put pressure on the housing.

During this same time, the stock of rental housing units dropped. No, I'm not kidding. It dropped, presumably because all those developers out there bought up three-decker rentals in Dorchester and South Boston and flipped them as condos. While the total housing stock in Boston increased by ~15,000 units in the past decade, rental housing units dropped from 167,000 to 160,000 units.

But I'm getting ahead of myself.

What are your thoughts?





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Old 10-24-2010, 11:45 PM   #7
Ron Newman
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

Why are all the columns blank for Harvard, MIT, and Tufts?

I thought I knew all the colleges of Greater Boston, but five of these are new to me: Bay State College, Boston Baptist College, Laboure, NE College of Finance, and Urban College of Boston. (Also, is MGH really a college, or are these actually Harvard medical students?)
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Old 10-25-2010, 07:12 AM   #8
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

Harvard has the Medical School, the Dental School, the School of Public Health, and the Business School in Boston. I am unaware of any MIT schools in Boston. Laboure is probably a nursing school; don't know whether MGH has similar.

Also no UMass Boston, none of the community colleges.

Some of Boston College's residence halls are not in Boston.
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Old 10-25-2010, 08:01 AM   #9
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

MGH Institute of Health Professions

I have a friend who works there.
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Old 10-25-2010, 08:13 AM   #10
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

MIT has many students living in officially-recognized fraternities and independent living groups, along Bay State Road, Beacon Street, and Comm. Ave. I lived in one of these at 111 Bay State Road.

The last part of MIT, the School of Architecture, moved out of Copley Square in 1937. It was then demolished to make way for the New England Mutual Life Insurance building. See The Rogers Building.

Last edited by Ron Newman; 10-25-2010 at 08:24 AM.
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Old 10-25-2010, 08:30 AM   #11
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Newman View Post
MIT has many students living in fraternities and officially-recognized independent living groups, along Bay State Road, Beacon Street, and Comm. Ave.
Harvard also has a graduate student high-rise on Western Ave (and Soldiers Field Rd?) in Allston. And I don't know whether all of the Hellenic College of the Holy Cross is entirely within Brookline, or not. Really getting into the minutia here. LOL

Laboure:
http://www.caritaschristi.org/Labour...t_Labour%C3%A9
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Old 10-25-2010, 10:56 AM   #12
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

Good stuff. Thanks for posting John.

One thing that jumps out at me is that the student population has not grown very rapidly at all (perhaps contrary to popular perception that students are "crowding out" residents).
Students go from 104K to 119K over 19 years. That works out to compounded annual growth rate of 0.7% (yes, less than 1%).
The city in general has gone from roughly 574K to 645K in that time (0.6% growth). So, the student population is growing at roughly the same rate as the city.
Of course, the difference is that the student growth is not shared equally among all neighborhoods in the city.
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Old 10-25-2010, 11:10 AM   #13
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

I suspect there are several projects that were left off this list. For instance, BU's recently approved East Campus Student Center is not included in those numbers. I'd be interested in seeing a comprehensive list of all university construction in Boston/Cambridge.
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:06 PM   #14
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

Well, those are all good questions. My goals are two: one, get a accurate tally of number of post-secondary students (grad and undergrad) in Boston; and, two, determine whether or not there's been an increase in the number of students living off-campus during the past ten & twenty years. (My hypothesis being that the higher housing prices of today cannot be blamed on students but instead on the general population increase that Boston has 'enjoyed' for the past decade.)

Thing is, I need to use consistent / accurate data in order to draw conclusions and I was unable to find all the numbers I needed in order to show the 1990, 2000, 2006, and 2008 figures.

The city requires private four-year universities to issue semi-annual student enrollment counts for its University Accountability Report. Unfortunately, I could only find Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 reports. I did find data from earlier years from the BRA and the city but they didn't have the break-down by individual college and they didn't include all the same individual colleges and universities.

The federal government website I mentioned has an exhaustive amount of data on it. It tallies undergrad, grad, full-time, part-time, and total enrollment for all colleges and universities, across the country. And, they have data going back thirty years. Unfortunately, they don't break down colleges by city, so there's no way to see how many students live in and out of Boston at MIT, Tufts or Harvard. I didn't include these colleges for this reason (and, you could argue I shouldn't for Boston College, either, given that it's located in Chestnut Hill and much of its campus is in Newton).

The city does have the in-Boston numbers for these colleges and universities but only from 2009 and 2010, like I said. So, I was stuck.

Below is the data from the city for 2009 and 2010 for these colleges and universities.

Final note - the city doesn't require two-year colleges (RCC and BHCC) or four-year public universities (UMASS-Boston) to report their enrollment figures. So, I didn't include them in the totals above. I guess I should and will in my next spreadsheet. I don't have a break-down of in- and out-of Boston figures and, since these colleges don't have dormitories, presumably all of the students live off-campus. But, many could possibly live out of the city and commute in. To include them all in the "in-Boston" off-campus number will inflate that figure. But, better to over-estimate the number of students living off-campus than underestimate, I guess.

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Old 10-25-2010, 12:09 PM   #15
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

MassArt is also a four-year public college in Boston.
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:10 PM   #16
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

The New England College of Business and Finance existed in Boston for around 90 years. During the late 1990's, it reorganized with its new emphasis on 'distance-learning', according to the Wikipedia entry. So, that's why there are students listed as living in Boston for the 1990 number but not included in any subsequent years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Eng...ss_and_Finance
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Old 10-25-2010, 01:24 PM   #17
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

UMass Boston states it has over 14,000 students.

Some enrollment and residency data for BHCC.
http://www.bhcc.mass.edu/inside/262
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Old 10-25-2010, 01:51 PM   #18
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by AmericanFolkLegend View Post
Good stuff. Thanks for posting John.

One thing that jumps out at me is that the student population has not grown very rapidly at all (perhaps contrary to popular perception that students are "crowding out" residents).
Students go from 104K to 119K over 19 years. That works out to compounded annual growth rate of 0.7% (yes, less than 1%).
The city in general has gone from roughly 574K to 645K in that time (0.6% growth). So, the student population is growing at roughly the same rate as the city.
Of course, the difference is that the student growth is not shared equally among all neighborhoods in the city.

This only deepens the theory in which direction the city is heading. Boston is completly becoming a college town. The only neighborhoods left are the poor ones.

This breaks down the city
#1 Students
#2 Grad Students
#3 Working Interns
#4 Poor Neighborhoods

#6 Super Rich
The gap missing is the Middle and upper class educated famalies, The city is pricing them out and it really doesn't make sense to become a working stiff or house poor in the city of Boston. This group creates neighborhood stability and pays the most in taxes.

Our city officials don't want this group in the city because in theory the less educated people that keep an eye on them the more they can get away with.

The only groups our politicans cater to are the Poor and Super Rich. The students don't vote. They usually come to the city for a length of time and jump ship somewhere more affordable.

It's actually pretty sad. It's very important to educate yourself and VOTE.

Great stuff JohnKeith.........

Last edited by TheRifleman; 10-25-2010 at 02:02 PM.
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Old 10-25-2010, 05:20 PM   #19
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

November 22, 2010, 4:00PM

Boston City Council hearing: "Impact of Off-Campus Students on Housing Prices in Boston"

"Residents from communities that have the highest percentage of off-campus students ... shall be invited to testify."

So I guess I'll just have to sit there and sigh heavily?

http://www.northendwaterfront.com/ho...hold-hear.html
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Old 10-25-2010, 05:31 PM   #20
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Re: A building boom on campus (Today's Globe?)

"Our city officials don't want this group in the city because in theory the less educated people that keep an eye on them the more they can get away with."

Sorry, but i hate when people say things like this because it sounds so f#$*ing stupid. I am not a fan of the mayor either or their development environment, but do you think its a coordinated plot by the mayor, BRA, and BPS to keep upper middle class families out of the city so they can oversee the greenway. that's really how cynical your view is on everything.

Yes, boston may have a gap, but i know a lot of people, college grads, professionals, middle class, that do live in the city, shop here, go out here. What boston can do is create more a more family friendly URBAN environment. that means tall apartment buildings and condos with safe parks and good schools. I think the real gap comes from the fact that for the last 60 years people equated middle class success with suburban space. Leaving the city to develop nice luxury condos for higher earners and people less concerned about child friendly parks and great schools (childless), and poorer people that relied on public transit to get to lower income service jobs that the middle class demands (via their purchases- see walmart, where everyone complains about the chinese taking over are country and they proceed to buy a bed, couch, tv, bike, and groceries all for $500 while missing their irony).

The current city structure is a confluence of public policy (federal, state, and local) and market based decisions over a 60 year period since WWII. NOT A MAYORAL CONSPIRACY.

It's simplistic, irrational statements and politically motivated conclusions that have no basis in a much more complex reality that is really hurting the country and the city, and its annoying that society is increasingly pandering to the lowest common denominator view like your statement.

Sorry Rifleman, I like many of your contributions to the board, but sometimes statements you seem to abandon reality.

/end rant
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