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Old 06-22-2008, 09:44 PM   #421
vanshnookenraggen
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

I'm not against a community having a say in their future, but when they live in a fantasy world it becomes hard to take them seriously. And Harvard hasn't helped at all. This whole thing is a clusterfuck of epic proportions.
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Old 06-22-2008, 09:56 PM   #422
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

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Originally Posted by vanshnookenraggen View Post
I'm not against a community having a say in their future, but when they live in a fantasy world it becomes hard to take them seriously.
Fantasy world? There's no fantasy in their world.

That's what's wrong.


* * *

(Honestly, in architectural quality, Boston no longer has an edge on Charlotte. In Boston, the smallest minds seem to rule.)
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Old 06-22-2008, 10:59 PM   #423
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

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(...In Boston, the smallest minds seem to rule.)
Welcome to Boston -- Everyone's gotta get his pound of flesh, even if it puts the butcher out of business.

Can "regime change" in City Hall un-fuck Boston? Or is it too late to put the toothpaste back in the tube?
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Old 06-22-2008, 11:10 PM   #424
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

What is the city's official position on all this? They seem to be completely absent from the process. Do we as a city have any comprehensive planning objectives whatsoever, or do we just do whatever the person who screams the loudest wants?

The urban planning in this city is completely fucking pathetic. Can we try to enter the 21st century some time soon please?
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Old 06-23-2008, 12:18 AM   #425
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

Briv,

The city's official position is they are discussing it with the neighborhood and Harvard

The real unofficial position is "He who has the gold makes the rules" and as Harvard has a lot of gold about $35B US and growing at about $8B / year -- hence reason that they are issuing bonds --they get to rule -- relative to the BRA or the neighborhood

However, Harvard's real problem with Alston-Brighton development is internal ? there faculty reeks of dissension driven by snobbery -- the grand Pooh-Bahs of Haaaahvaaahd Sq -- don't want to move -- lacking contiguous growth space - a la MIT and being fractured into innumerable fiefdoms -- they can build it -- but will they come?


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Old 06-23-2008, 06:59 AM   #426
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

Westy, you are right about university politics. Harvard is a feudal state; an uneasy and unequal amalgam of baronies.

I believe the initial hope was to get the Law School to move to Allston, but they would not budge. The JFK School also stayed put; after all, relatively speaking, they have just moved in. The Divinity School is probably the richest school in Harvard in terms of endowment per capita, and not much gained from moving them. Thus to Allston march the poorer relations: the Graduate School of Education, which is currently a bit disconnected from the contiguous Harvard Cambridge campus, and Public Health, from Longwood.

It could have been interesting to have the Graduate School of Design relocate to Allston: new buildings, adventurous design perhaps, but GSD is poor by Harvard terms and probably couldn't afford to go.
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My thoughts on the failings to date re: planning for Harvard in Allston.

> Harvard: wearing a big set of blinders. Harvard limited the institutional master plan to the property it wants to develop for Harvard academic purposes, which is basically east of N. Harvard St. Harvard ignored the land it owns and continues to acquire west of North Harvard St, along the Western Ave. corridor. With Harvard silent on its intentions for the latter land, a programmatic and policy void is created that others are eager to fill, and not always constructively.

> The City of Boston: for being both too ambitious and not ambitious enough. Some how, some way, the city got the N. Allston community to buy into a goal of about 2,500 new housing units. The community seems to have not recognized that so many new units could only be built, given the available land, by going up and going dense. The transportation aspect of the N. Allston Strategic Framework sticks to the current highway grid. No suggestion for a new bridge over the Pike, to re-connect Franklin St.; or to make the Western Ave bridge two way. And it seems the BRA has reneged on a promise for a special study of the Holton St. Corridor.

> The community: for living in a wish-list world, where nearly every whim must be satisfied and made to fit. Contradictions abound in this world. For example, their latest proposal apparently moves Shaw's into the ground floor of a new building on Western Ave. (Shaw's counts as part of the 200,000 sq ft of retail that the community seeks to have near Barry's Corner.) Putting aside that there are no proposed buildings on Western Ave with a footprint large enough to replicate the current Shaws, the free surface parking disappears and is replaced by underground parking. How many people would drive and shop at Shaw's if they had to pay for parking?
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Old 06-23-2008, 10:41 PM   #427
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

Surely I'm not the first person to point this out, but Harvard is treating the residents of Allston a hell of a lot better than the BRA did.
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Old 06-24-2008, 06:24 AM   #428
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

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Surely I'm not the first person to point this out, but Harvard is treating the residents of Allston a hell of a lot better than the BRA did.
I have no idea what the street grid was like back then, but when building the Mass Pike, the MTA and the city chose to largely isolate N. Allston from the rest of Boston.

They built only two bridges crossing the Mass Pike, and these are at the western end. (A bridge over the Pike keeping Franklin St. joined would have been a straight-forward span; a bridge linking N. Harvard St to Comm Ave near what is now the western end of BU feasible but much more expensive.) The result is a street grid where every major street bisecting the heart of N. Allston comes to a dead end. Everett St, which has a bridge, ends at Western Ave; N. Harvard St. ends at the Mass Pike; and traffic wanting to go to Cambridge can't traverse the westbound only Western Ave bridge. Their thinking back then was positively perverse.

The result was to leave N. Allston a backwater, whose central features were toll booths, highway ramps, giant warehouses, a railyard, and a smattering of light industry. How else was Harvard able to acquire so much land at an affordable price, even for Harvard?

But, IMO, this isolation also inoculated N. Allston against the economic forces that were changing other Boston neighborhoods. And this also bred a certain parochialism, a fear of change, and quite probably an apprehension that N. Allston is about to get screwed again. Largely content with their neighborhood as is, they seek to preserve it.

The paradox is the more that N. Allstonites try to preserve and build up the current form and characteristics of their community, the more likely it will gentrify. The more they try to cap its population, the more quickly it will become an academic bedroom for BU, MIT, and Harvard.
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Old 07-20-2008, 01:41 AM   #429
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

7/16, from the north.





Mockup coming along



From the south.





While taking pics on the south end of the site a construction manager by the name of Kenny happened to be walking my way. He said how ya doin or something, and I asked him a question. Next thing I know he's telling me all sorts of stuff -- everything I could possibly want to know about the project -- and by the time we parted ways, a entire half hour had passed. My god, I didn't have to do any coaxing whatsoever to get him to open up!

So here's what he has to say:

My initial question was about the dump trucks carting away the excavated land, as I was blown away by the number of trucks going in-out, in-out, in and out of the site; it was a nonstop dance. Kenny first replied that in the previous week they filled up 208 trucks in eight hours (which works out to one truck leaving every two minutes and eighteen seconds). He then said that they could do it faster, but the process of washing down the wheels limited them. Neighbors have complained about dust getting kicked up, and with them digging into lots of clay (which gets stuck in the tires easily) it means they must be extra thorough when hosing down the vehicles.

On the topic of excavation, he remarked on the site's history and how it all used to be lowlands with a little river running east-west through the middle of the site (long dry) and how the fill used to created developable land varied widely from one area to another. He spoke of how in some spots there would be a 20 foot deep stretch of stone rubble, while in another section it was all timber, and how in another section it was timber, then clay, then more timber!

Most interesting of all was the story of the northwest corner, site of a shellac (varnish) workshop a hundred years ago. He said that when they dug down past eight feet they could actually smell the shellac ("the history" as he put it) in the air. He said that area was by far the dirtiest land they'd removed, which bring me to the next point.

Kenny also talked about how asbestos-laden asphalt shingles were dumped on the site, and that because of this Harvard had to opt for treating the entire top 4-6 feet of excavation as asbestos-contaminated, going to its own landfill, while in reality he said the actual amount of land that truly contained the stuff would have fit "in the back of a pickup truck." But with litigation being what it is, they had no choice.

One last note on excavation findings -- the lions. They're in this garage.



And sitting out front was another piece of granite that on the face-down side had a fluted column carved in it (visible above in the foreground).

As has been reported, they found about a dozen lions, but Kenny said only "four or five" of them were restorable, the others being too fragmented or missing too many parts altogether to be worth doing anything with. I asked him if he had any insights into where they could've came from, and all he could do was shrug and say "it's a mystery."

One intriguing factoid -- while removing an old sewer system, they discovered that a lion's head had been used to form a part of the entry shaft's wall! They positioned it just so and let the concrete pour in and around it.

More on the area's utilities, there's a 72-inch diameter sewer line that runs north-south on the western edge of the site (the west slurry wall is within five feet of it), and he spoke of how as they remove land the walls generally tend to move inwards by a couple of inches. The Water and Sewer Commission recently told them that the pipe can't move any inches at all, whereas they thought an allowance of one and a quarter inches was OK, so now they're in the process of installing a several-million-dollar fiberglass shell around it to protect it or something.... I forget exactly what he said.

I also forgot why he said they were behind schedule, but he said that because of this they changed plans: originally they were to finish excavation and pour the concrete mat across the entire site all at once. However, they're now working to excavate and pour the northeast corner first, and then work out from there. This, however, creates logistical problems as it means excavating and concrete pouring machinery will be on the site at the same time.

The first pouring will take place in October.

Next, he talked about the buildings. He spoke at length about the innovative new structural system they're using, imported from Germany. They're called Geilinger Columns, and they have a solid steel core and steel outer shell that gets filled with (in this case) 6,000 psi concrete, resulting in a fireproof column that is slimmer than what you'd get with a structurally equal steel or reinforced concrete column. To tie them in with the floor decks, the tip of each steel core sticks up and acts as the setting point for the next column. Meanwhile, rebar beams turn in and out of the voids where concrete will go in.



http://www.spannverbund.net/en/produ...inger-stuetze/

This is the first time they're using the system in the US, and as a result Boston's Inspectional Services Department had people go to Germany to be shown that it's an acceptable construction method.

As for the floor decks, they're using the Bubble Deck system, another import from across the Atlantic.

http://www.bubbledeck.com/

According to the website, they place plastic bubbles in the parts of the concrete slab that are dead weight, where it doesn't contribute to carying structural loads. This in turn makes for a lightweight slab capable of large spans. This system also doesn't require any beams to carry the slab, meaning mechanicals won't need to bend their way down and around beams. All told, the slabs for this project will be 12 inches thick, whereas the typical slab-on-deck-on-beam is usually 18 inches or so.





As an aside, these Bubble Decks allow for cantilevers up to ten times the slab's thickness, meaning on this project they could theoretically place the columns 10 feet in from the facade without needed any kind of reinforcing.



Last thing for now, he said the old book depository on Western Ave would be down within a year or so, and probably the same for the WGBH building.
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Old 07-20-2008, 03:34 AM   #430
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

That might just be the best single post ever on archBoston.
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Old 07-20-2008, 11:38 AM   #431
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

kz, wonderful post, and very informative. Glad we know where the lions are as well. I have several pictures that I'll post on Tuesday which show the full slurry wall and tiebacks along the east and north sides (looks to be 3 stories deep).

I'll also post pictures of the first stage of Harvard's relocating much of its current athletic complrx. This can be seen as you drive along Soldier's Field Road between WBZ and N. Harvard St. They are installing a field turf field, I was told by a worker its the first of either 3 or 4 such fields. I suspect this first one may replace the field with the running track south of the stadium. The worker also said they will be moving the soccer field (between the B school and Charlesview) in the next year or so.

The external mockup, as your pictures show, does not seem to have either windows or a limestone facade yet installed. I assume that these are still being cut / fabricated. The internal mockup is inside the WGBH building on the south side of Western Ave.
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Old 07-22-2008, 07:59 AM   #432
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

From July 20th:

The Science Center, Phase 1
The Great Allston Wall now appears on Western Ave, on the east side of the VW dealer. (Harvard owns the dealership land, but won't build on this for a while.) The Great Allston Wall must now stretch hundreds of yards.



Two views of the slurry wall and tiebacks. Excavation looks to be about three stories deep. The views are of the eat wall (next to the former WGBH building, and north wall along Western Ave, with Charlesview in the background. The top picture shows the NW corner where the shellac factory described by kz once stood.





Relocating the playing fields near the stadium.

This is a large pile of dirt obtained from scraping the surface and subsurface of former grass-covered fields. The pile covers much of the former surface parking area for Harvard stadium. Don't know where the generous benefactors will now park.



A drainage pond used for filtering storm water runoff. Harvard may have installed a storm sewer system in this while area; looked to be a new set of grates along the perimeter road. This swale led to a large mechanical separator that is used to filter the stormwater.



The stone base for the new field turf field(s). First view is looking east, second view is looking west. These fields are located near thye horseshoe bend on Soldiers Field Rd.





Demolition Time. Preservations take note:

These buildings, north of the stadium, are supposed to be demolished, after new facilities are built south of the stadium, which, in part, is why the athletic fields are being relocated.

The hockey arena:


The indoor tennis building


Dillon Field House. It will be interesting to see if the cupola is saved and reused.


The basketball pavillion.


The swimming pool below will be spared and used as part of the new undergraduate housing complex to be built where the to-be-demolished buildings currently stand. View looking SW from N. Harvard St. and Soldiers Field Road (at least I think it is Soldiers Field Road and not Storrow Drive at that point). A new swimming pool will be built south of the stadium.

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Old 07-22-2008, 11:23 AM   #433
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

Dillon looks like something you'd want to keep and reuse for a different purpose. Is it definitely on the chopping block?
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Old 07-22-2008, 02:33 PM   #434
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

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Dillon looks like something you'd want to keep and reuse for a different purpose. Is it definitely on the chopping block?
Ron, the 10 year plan is for Harvard to build four undergraduate houses in Allston, with a total of 800,000 sq. ft. I believe these four houses are intended eventually to replace the three houses in the "Quad" (Currier, Cabot, and Pforzheimer) way northwest of Harvard Sq. The Quad housing could then be converted to graduate school housing; -- maybe even Law School housing and finally the law school could demolish the converted motel on Mass Ave.

The 12 undergrad houses at Harvard currently house between 350 and 450 students each.

But before the Quad can become housing for graduate students, Harvard has now decided to completely renovate its current undergraduate houses, starting with the oldest, which are nearing 80 years old. I suspect that Harvard will use some or all of the new houses as swing space while the older houses are closeed and renovated, and after that is done, the undergrads would move out of the Quad houses.



In the above map, the proposed new undergraduate houses would stretch from the middle of Jordan Field (field hockey,synthetic turf) to Blodgett pool. The span is roughly equivalent to the space occupied by Eliot, Winthrop, and Leverett houses along the north side of the river.

Given the urgent need to renovate the older houses, I will rashly speculate that Harvard will start construction of new athletic venues n 2009, demolish the indoor tennis court and Dillon in 2009, and start construction of the first of the houses in 2009 as well. The second wave of demolition would occur after the new athletic venues (basketball and hockey) are done. The new pool would be the last to be built. This might allow Harvard to start renovating the first of the old houses in the 2011-2012 academic year, and by 2012-13 at the latest. Unlike BC, Harvard doesn't have to worry about the abutting neighbors with regard to the new undergraduate housing.

I suspect there are several architectural teams already sketching plans for upwards of 15-20 new Harvard buildings in Allston to be built within the next five or six years.

In short, I don't think Dillon can be saved, but maybe its form and style can reappear elsewhere in Allston.
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Old 07-22-2008, 03:03 PM   #435
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

I'm sure this has been covered, but isn't one of the problems with the Allston campus that it's completely inaccessible by Subway? Does Harvard run a redline shuttle or something?
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Old 07-22-2008, 03:25 PM   #436
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

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I'm sure this has been covered, but isn't one of the problems with the Allston campus that it's completely inaccessible by Subway? Does Harvard run a redline shuttle or something?
Harvard does run a shuttle system: I believe it goes no further into Allston than to the B School. Harvard is promising to expand shuttle services into Allston when construction of the new science complex is done. North Allstonites would like to have access to this service.

And there is also the Urban Ring, which, if ever built, would probably run into Allston. And there is the possibility of a commuter rail stop too.
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Old 07-22-2008, 05:06 PM   #437
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

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I'm sure this has been covered, but isn't one of the problems with the Allston campus that it's completely inaccessible by Subway? Does Harvard run a redline shuttle or something?
I thought that "back in the day" there was a spur branch off of the red line in the direction of Harvard Stadium, used once every two years for The Game. Am I mistaken? Was it above ground? Filled in? Is it still there?

Quote:
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In the above map, the proposed new undergraduate houses would stretch from the middle of Jordan Field (field hockey,synthetic turf) to Blodgett pool. The span is roughly equivalent to the space occupied by Eliot, Winthrop, and Leverett houses along the north side of the river.
I was told once by a guide at the Longfellow house that Longfellow owned all of the land across the river from his house (the harvard athletic areas) and left it to Harvard on two conditions: 1) the view from his house to the river be maintained (hence the odd mall in the middle of the neighborhood that does just this) and 2) the land be used in perpetuity for athletics. I understood this as a Isabella Gardner-type pact. Is this wrong? Is Harvard reneging?
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Old 07-22-2008, 06:34 PM   #438
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

Until 1979, the Red Line used to turn southwest under Brattle Square to a storage yard where the JFK School of Government and JFK Park are now. The occasionally-used 'Stadium station' was in this yard, still on the Cambridge side of the river. This short section of tunnel still exists, but is no longer connected to the Red Line tracks. There's some talk that Harvard and/or the MBTA could reuse it for other transit purposes (a busway? a Green Line stub-end?)
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Old 07-22-2008, 08:11 PM   #439
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

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Harvard does run a shuttle system: I believe it goes no further into Allston than to the B School. Harvard is promising to expand shuttle services into Allston when construction of the new science complex is done. North Allstonites would like to have access to this service.

And there is also the Urban Ring, which, if ever built, would probably run into Allston. And there is the possibility of a commuter rail stop too.
There's also the LMA Shuttle which runs back and forth from Harvard Square to Longwood, via Coolidge Corner and Kenmore Square. It's free to anyone with a Harvard ID card. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong.
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Old 07-23-2008, 12:07 AM   #440
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Re: Harvard - Allston Campus

Does anybody know the history of Dillon? It really looks like the sort of thing Harvard would pay Bob Stern millions to copy-cat design as part of an expansion of the business school... In other words, it's the only building that's ever turned my head in a pleasant way in years of driving past the athletic complex. It'd be a nice entryway to a new complex, easing the transition from the older Cambridge campus to the new campus of dorms placed a bit farther back.

The rest of the complex is definitely a bit of a failure. This may sound odd when referring to an athletic complex, but there's somehow too much open space. It's double-plus ungood that the pool is being salvaged. Stellarfun, are you sure they're choosing to hang on to that junk?

My pipedream is for the Allston crowd to quit fighting Harvard's efforts to build a vibrant, dense campus in the otherwise-empty lots of Allston and take up Dillon's cause...
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