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archBOSTON.org http://www.archboston.org/community en Fri, 17 Aug 2018 05:54:11 GMT vBulletin 5 http://www.archboston.org/community/images/misc/rss.jpg archBOSTON.org http://www.archboston.org/community The Boston Three Decker as Housing Stock http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5696&goto=newpost Wed, 15 Aug 2018 14:08:08 GMT From part of a comment Fitchburg line made in the Julie Hall thread.
Quote:

(Also: profit grubbing? Nonprofit developers didn't build Beacon Hill, Back Bay, North End, all triple deckers, etc)
A rather fascinating narrative on the history of the three decker.
https://www.dotnews.com/2018/profili...n-three-decker

Quote:

Early on, variants of three-deckers were solid investment properties for wealthy builders who could live in one house and use neighboring ones for rental income. But the housing stock was maligned by anti-immigrant groups, said independent museum consultant Deedee Jacobsohn at the April conference at All Saints Church in Ashmont. Housing organizations, partnering with the Immigration Restriction League, claimed they were made with balloon framing, were structurally shoddy, susceptible to fire, and had crumbling roofs and chimneys.

In a 1911 report, the Massachusetts Civil League and the State Housing Committee wrote: “Foreigners are coming in increasing numbers, and with them are also coming the shack, the converted house which has seen better days, the familiar frame tenement, and the wooden “three decker” which, besides being objectionable on other grounds, is a flimsy fire-trap and a menace to human life.”
^^^ From the narrative.

And I learned that Ted Williams lived in a three decker while playing for the Sox, ]]>
stellarfun http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5696
Liberty Tree Plaza http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5695&goto=newpost Tue, 14 Aug 2018 13:53:27 GMT For years it has gnawed at me that Boston has done so little to celebrate what could, arguably, be the most famous physical symbol of the Revolution... For years it has gnawed at me that Boston has done so little to celebrate what could, arguably, be the most famous physical symbol of the Revolution in Boston. In terms of their actual respective roles in the fight for independence, the Liberty Tree was FAR more significant than the Liberty Bell.

That's why I was initially so excited . . . and then immediately disappointed, to see that construction is underway to turn Liberty Tree Plaza from this:



To this:


I'm sure there will be all sorts of historical background on those granite blocks, but let's be honest here: 99% of the people passing this plaza by will think it's nothing more than a place to sit and eat a salad.

It's a shame, because this should be a major site in the city. My fanciful idea was always to transplant one of the historic, John Hancock planted trees from the Common to this spot. Specifically, the one that sits smack dab in front of the State House, ruining what should be an iconic view from the mall:



This would have kept an actual living link to the Revolution alive at the site, along with aesthetically improving the Common. I also liked the idea of supplementing the tree with some sort of abstract sculpture, to keep it attractive and eye-catching in the winter.

Knowing nothing about horticulture, however, I've always suspected that transplanting such a mature tree would be impossible. Further, after doing a little digging, I think it's possible that the particular tree that blocks the view of the State House isn't one of the Hancock elms (it seems all the writing on the supposed Hancock trees refers only to the two trees that flank the Shaw Memorial, not this one).

What I'd like to see in the alternative, is something sculptural. Perhaps similar to what used to be in Danvers's Liberty Tree Mall (which was originally created for the New England pavilion of the 1964 World's Fair, and then subsequently placed on the Common before moving to the mall):





Sure, it might seem weird to put up a representation of a tree instead of an actual tree in celebration of what was, of course, an actual tree. But again, if you just plant a tree there, no one will realize it's supposed to be anything special. Besides, calling a tree that first sprouted after the year 2000 the Liberty Tree, is a little hokey and deceptive. The sculpture would be more honest. ]]>
Development Projects BronsonShore http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5695
MXD II | 325 Main St. | Kendall Square http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5693&goto=newpost Mon, 13 Aug 2018 02:19:20 GMT https://www.bizjournals.com/boston/news/2018/04/25/google-could-anchor-next-big-boston-properties.html ... https://www.bizjournals.com/boston/n...roperties.html

http://www.cambridgema.gov/~/media/F...0725.pdf?la=en

http://www.cambridgema.gov/~/media/F...0725.pdf?la=en

BXP has applied to shift the office tower portion of MXD Phase II from Binney St. adjacent to the future Volpe Center site to the current site of the COOP. BBJ had reported a while back that the change is at the request of Google, which has office space in the current 325 Main and would occupy the new building.

They give 4 potential massings without a listed height, but all of them appear to be taller than the Marriott, which would put this building at about 300 feet. ]]>
Development Projects Equilibria http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5693
Providence Transit http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5692&goto=newpost Sun, 12 Aug 2018 21:20:14 GMT I just wanted to create this thread for further use, to hold all the proposals bouncing around The Renaissance City for streetcars, commuter and... I just wanted to create this thread for further use, to hold all the proposals bouncing around The Renaissance City for streetcars, commuter and light rails, BRTS, upgraded bus service and even subway pipe dreams.

They got the Rapid Bus line built, which is a watered down or streamlined BRT system, without exclusive right-of-way.

There have been several articles and studies on transit.

http://www.gcpvd.org/category/transportation/page/3/ ]]>
Greater New England Hubman http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5692
Diagrams on Skyscraperpage http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5691&goto=newpost Sat, 11 Aug 2018 11:55:35 GMT When you type Boston (+Cambridge, Somerville, Everett, Brookline, Quincy, Chelsea, Newton) into Skyscraperpage's diagrams page and search for buildings under construction, this is literally the entire list of buildings it shows!

Capture by David Z, on Flickr


This is something that has been bothering me for a while, and I don't want to be the only person who ever follows up to get it updated (Odurandina, where are you?!). Appropriate backup on the heights is needed and it can be a pain to be the only person looking for it.

Buildings that are missing completely over 200'....
Topped out:
Northeastern Dorm - Columbus Ave Student Housing (272')
Julie Hall Emannuel Dorm (~205')
MXD Cambridge (300', or possibly 314' according to Odurandina)

Well underway over 200':
Echelon, ie M1-M2 in Seaport (~260', x3 separate towers)
NEMA Seaport (~250'-260')
Marriott Moxy (273')
MIT's 5(?) tower project East Campus (highest dorm tower is 381', unsure about rest but all over 200' and up to 295')
Mass + Main Residential in Central Square (~205')

More under 200':
Education First Cambridge
Northpoint blocky thing Cambridge
Six West Broadway Hotel South Boston

There are also some issues with the proposed section for anybody who wants to continue to fight the good fight, but for now it's really glaring to not have any of these above buildings listed when they are all out of the ground, many topped out! ]]>
DZH22 http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5691
Copyright and Bird Law Lawyerings http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5694&goto=newpost Fri, 10 Aug 2018 15:40:35 GMT ---Quote (Originally by odurandina)--- Image: http://i1024.photobucket.com/albums/y302/odurandina/1%20Dalton2_zpstdzpl3cj.jpg ...
Quote:

Originally Posted by odurandina (Post 328029)



This is copyrighted work. Is it yours, or did you get permission to post it? ]]>
General GW http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5694
Ollie | 217 Albany St | South End http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5690&goto=newpost Thu, 09 Aug 2018 23:42:10 GMT "Newly approved by the Boston Planning & Development Agency, Ollie is soon to be the latest and greatest addition to the South End’s Ink Block residences. The project will be Boston’s first major co-living project, delivering 250 micro-units and shared suites........."

https://www.bostonrealestate.com/dev...-at-Ink-Block/













]]>
Development Projects stick n move http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5690
Indianapolis, a Bike Haven City http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5688&goto=newpost Thu, 02 Aug 2018 21:15:03 GMT Indianapolis is probably best-known for the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race, Image: https://farm1.staticflickr.com/939/41936106860_d3aa372ca6_b.jpg ... Indianapolis is probably best-known for the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race,





but, should also be recognized for its ambitious downtown Cultural Trail.

A beautiful bike and pedestrian trail with an eight mile length, I don’t think that this trail takes a back seat to any city. Visit Indy - $2 million dollars in public art, 5 acres of plants and trees, transforming the landscape, impacting the environment, bioswales, natural storm water management, promoting fitness, connecting people and places, the Journey is the Destination.

With a lead gift of $15 million dollars from Eugene and Marilyn Glick, ground-breaking began in 2007 and the trail was completed in 2013.

In February, 2008, the organization, Projects for Public Spaces, published the article, BOLD MOVES AND BRAVE ACTIONS, and stated, ”Indianapolis, Indiana, is taking what may be the boldest step of any American city towards supporting bicyclists and pedestrians”. After looking at before-and-after pictures, one can reach the conclusion that this trail was a game-changing project for Indianapolis.

Indianapolis Star, July 23, 2015
Study: Property values along Cultural Trail up $1B

“Property values have increased by $1 billion, businesses report more customers and higher sales, and residents feel safer Downtown since construction of the 8-mile Cultural Trail, according to a survey conducted by Indiana University Public Policy Institute.”

“Twenty-six percent of businesses said they now open on weekends, and 23 percent said they close later.”

“You can look around today, especially on Virginia Avenue, and see how the Cultural Trail already has changed our city,” Mayor Greg Ballard said in a prepared statement. “The impact is significant, and it will continue to grow in the years ahead.”

“The $63 million Cultural Trail was created through a public-private partnership between the city of Indianapolis and Central Indiana Community Foundation, which raised $27.5 million in private support. An additional $35.5 million came from federal transportation grants.”

Indianapolis Business Journal, Nov 4, 2017
Cultural Trail becomes unique drawing card for conventions and trade shows

“Indianapolis’ Cultural Trail has been called “a linear welcome mat,” “a directional sign” and “a marketer’s dream.”

“Of the $63 million total, $6 million was set aside in an endowment, which pays out 5 percent—or $300,000—annually for maintenance and improvements.”

“In 2014, the Indiana University Public Policy Institute placed counters on the Cultural Trail that estimated 1 million people used it that year.”

““We see people on the trail at all hours,” said Visit Indy Vice President Chris Gahl. “At 9 or 10 o’clock on a warm night, the trail can be pretty crowded.”

“About 4,500 volunteers also signed up to help maintain the trail.”

“There are already more than 20 cities that want to copy it.”

“Then the New York Times weighed in with two articles. One came in an early 2014 travel section that touted Indianapolis as one of 52 must-see destinations around the world. The reason, the Times raved, was the Cultural Trail.”
“You can’t buy publicity like that,” “... we realized what the Cultural Trail would mean from the standpoint of attracting visitors. But The New York Times article blew the lid off of that.”

“But there’s an important distinction between Indianapolis’ Cultural Trail and those urban trails (High Line in New York, the BeltLine in Atlanta, and the 606 in Chicago).” “We built this trail where people wanted to go, not just where there was a rail corridor or other available land,”


All views are from the trail except where noted. They are interspersed with photos of the trail.







On Washington Street looking east







Artsgarden over Washington Street, Cultural Trail on right side of picture









Circle Centre Mall is an attractive, solid-looking mall, I liked the food court setting.



This picture is from the Circle Centre Mall garage, parking starts at $3 for up to 3 hours - take that Boston! Mall opened in September, 1995. Garage one block off the Trail, mall entrance across the street from the Trail.











East side of downtown looking west











North side of downtown looking south













Memorial for the World War II heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis, accessible via a ramp off the Trail.







Movie clip of actor Robert Shaw’s monologue describing the USS Indianapolis sinking from the blockbuster 1975 movie, “Jaws”. Some people think that it is the best scene in the movie.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=u9S41Kplsbs


The date mentioned of the ship sinking is one day off and the number of men onboard is 1196 according to the memorial, not 1100 as spoken in the movie. The tour guide for the Indianapolis Speedway tour said that 17 survivors were alive (July 27, 2018). They have a yearly reunion at the Memorial Day race.



Trail passes over canal



















Pacers Bikeshare







The Downtown Canal Walk is a 3-mile loop.
West side of downtown looking east







This part of The Canal Walk is a couple of blocks from the Trail













This walkway connects the Cultural Trail to the east side of the White River Trail



The art installations make the trail more interesting





A short piece of the Cultural Trail runs through White River State Park



The Cultural Trail connects with the west side of the White River Trail and the Indianapolis Zoo over this bridge.



White River, there is a bike trail on each side.









Looking back at White River State Park



South side of the trail looking north, have looped around downtown











Half a block off the trail









The heart of Downtown Indianapolis, Monument Circle, one block off the trail.
On Market Street looking east at Soldiers and Sailors Monument.











Salesforce Tower









This Midwestern city had an advantage at the start for placing a bike path, that is, wide thoroughfares.





















The Cultural Trail connects with the southern terminus of the 23 mile Monon Trail, a trail included in the Rails to Trails Conservancy’s ‘Top 100 US Trails’.



















Open a flap, take a book



Lights turn on and off as the movement of a cyclist or pedestrian passes by











How does the Connect Historic Boston Bike Trail compare to the Cultural Trail?

http://indyculturaltrail.org/about/ ]]>
EdMc http://www.archboston.org/community/showthread.php?t=5688