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View Full Version : Hall of Fame (CHOOSE 3)


briv
02-14-2012, 10:15 PM
REMEMBER TO CHOOSE 3!

Polls close 11:59pm on March 1.

A list of all previous winners can be found here: http://www.archboston.org/awards/

In no particular order:

1. Columbus Park
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/columbuspark.jpg

2. Castle Island & Pleasure Bay
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/castleisland.jpg

3. Public Garden
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/Public_Garden_Boston.jpg

4. Lagoon Bridge
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/Public_Garden_Lagoon_3.jpg

5. Kresge Auditorium
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/Kresge_Auditorium_MIT_view_with_Green_Building.jpg

6. Winthrop Building
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/WinthropBldg.jpg

7. SS Pierce building
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/ss_pierce_building.jpg

8. MIT Building 10
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/MIT_Dome_night1_Edit.jpg

9. MFA
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/mfa.jpg

10. Lenox Hotel
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/lenoxhotel.jpg

11. New Old South Church
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/OldSouthChurchBoston.jpg

12. Faneuil Hall Marketplace
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/faneuilhall.jpg

13. Symphony Hall
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/Symphony_hall_boston.jpg

14. Jordan Hall
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/Jordanhallbalcony.jpg

15. Ames Building
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/ames-building.jpg

16. Wigglesworth Building
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/WigglesworthBoston.jpg

17. The Esplanade
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/Charles_River_Esplanade_Boston_Massachusetts.jpg

18. Southwest Corridor Park
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/sw_corridor_park.jpg

19. Back Bay Fens
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/bb_fens.jpg

20. Boston Common
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/Boston-Commom-LG.jpg

21. Thomas Park
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/ThomasPark1.jpg

22. Longfellow Bridge
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/Longfellow.jpg

23. Post Office Square
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/po_sq.jpg

24. Federal Reserve
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/FederalReserveBankBuildingBoston.jpg

25. Church of the Advent
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/BOSTON_ADVENT.jpg

26. All Saints Ashmont
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/All_saints_church-2003.jpg

27. Boylston Street Firehouse
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/boylstonfirehouse.jpg

28. Ether Dome
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/mgh_etherdome.jpg

29. Forest Hills Cemetery
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/foresthillscem.jpg

30. Mt Auburn Cemetery
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/2011%20HOF/mtauburn.jpg

31. Batterymarch Building
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/batterymarch_building_boston.jpg

32. Five Cents Savings Bank
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/boston_five_cent_savings_kmw.jpg

33. MIT Chapel
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/MIT_Chapel_Cambridge_Massachusetts_-_interior.jpg

34. Blackstone Block
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/Union_Oyster_Blackstone_block.jpg

35. West End's Last Tenement
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/hall%20of%20fame%202010/west_end_lone_tenement.jpg

36. State Services Center
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y99/briv1/Hall%20of%20Shame%202010/Boston-City-Hall.jpg

Ron Newman
02-15-2012, 09:33 PM
The photo that you have labelled "MIT 77 Mass. Ave" is actually not the smaller Mass. Ave. dome (Building 7), but rather the larger one facing the Charles River across the Great Court (Building 10).

I suggest leaving the photo as is, but changing the caption (and poll choice) accordingly.

briv
02-16-2012, 06:16 AM
Thanks, Ron. I was searching around for the name of that building. I'm surprised these buildings have such anonymous names.

Ron Newman
02-16-2012, 07:53 AM
The oldest part of MIT is one very large building, now arbitrarily divided up into building numbers 1, 3, 10, 4, and 2. Everything else (including the Building 7 entrance at 77 Mass. Ave.) was added on later.

Officially, buildings 3, 10, and 4 are the Maclaurin Buildings, named after the MIT president who oversaw their construction.

Building 7, the grand staircase entrance on Mass. Ave., is officially the Rogers Building, named after MIT's founder. MIT had an earlier Rogers Building, now demolished, in the Back Bay.

DZH22
02-19-2012, 11:25 AM
New Old South Church, Ames Building, and Federal Reserve (11, 15, 24)

found5dollar
02-19-2012, 10:29 PM
this year i found it especially hard to pick only 3... there is alot of great buildings nomed.

whighlander
02-23-2012, 05:23 PM
I agree the mix of parks and buildings made three insufficient

In the future there should be two separate award categories:

1) parks, bridges and infrastructure
2) buildings

Bubbybu
02-24-2012, 02:55 PM
how can you choose just three here? it's like impossible

czsz
02-24-2012, 03:14 PM
You can knock out quite a few, I think. Christopher Columbus park - really hall of fame worthy? A couple nondescript churches. The SS Pierce building is nice but does it really deserve induction over, say, the New Old South Church? I would apply that same logic to PO Square...

briv
02-25-2012, 02:27 AM
So most of the obvious ones have already made it into the Hall of Fame. Maybe this year we can look at the less obvious ones, like the State Services Center (I know I'm dreaming), or the Five Cents Savings Bank, or the Last Tenement, the last true living vestige of the West End--which is in danger of being gobbled up by North Station development. Or how about the MIT Chapel, who's thoughtful, space-age design has influenced so many other buildings.

found5dollar
02-25-2012, 08:25 AM
I agree the mix of parks and buildings made three insufficient

In the future there should be two separate award categories:

1) parks, bridges and infrastructure
2) buildings

as i stated before in the Best New Development Thread, "Thats what I think makes these awards, and this website, so interesting. The mix of architecture, urban planning, and urban quality of life stuff make a really rich variety of nominees." I too had an exceptionally hard time choosing only 3, but that s good news. Boston has so many great things that, hopefully, the creme de la creme of all of it will be what is inducted.

statler
02-25-2012, 08:49 AM
Look, there is no polite way to say this so I'll just spit out.

If the Winthrop Building don't win I'm burning this place to the fucking ground.

Choose wisely.

kz1000ps
02-25-2012, 12:09 PM
Sorry Statler, but no Winthrop for me (not yet at least). As it turns out I voted for two parks and a church in Ashmont.

Pierce
02-26-2012, 08:59 AM
maybe next year a runoff to get the nominees down to 7-10 finalists? or do it via tournament bracket?

this list is way too long, and there is far too much decent but middling stuff.... it looks like a tourist's vacation photo set. We need to separate the wheat from the chaff here

czsz
02-26-2012, 10:02 PM
the Last Tenement, the last true living vestige of the West End--which is in danger of being gobbled up by North Station development

The implication here is that the awards can help save / improve Boston's architecture/infrastructure/urbanism?

Why not try to put them to work this year? All we need to really do is send a targeted press release to local publications plus local urbanists like Robert Campbell and Anthony Flint...

Ron Newman
02-26-2012, 11:38 PM
The Last Tenement is noteworthy for having survived, but deprived of any context whatsoever (old or new) it doesn't do a whole lot for the city. Either it should be built around in a sympathetic manner, or it should be moved somewhere else where it can be better appreciated.

statler
03-02-2012, 05:06 AM
http://i.imgur.com/A5NG0.gif

czsz
03-02-2012, 09:42 AM
Ames Building over New Old South? WHY?

Justin7
03-02-2012, 10:14 AM
The Public Garden/Bridge split the vote. Rigged election.

datadyne007
03-02-2012, 02:43 PM
FHM so deserved it. I'm so glad it has been enshrined. The impact it has on our city is simply outstanding. It is the guaranteed place where any tourist in the world visiting Boston will end up. I also particularly enjoy its siting right in the true history of Boston (Faneuil Hall and the Harbor). It's not some shopping mecca that is removed from the history.

czsz
03-03-2012, 01:02 PM
^ I like FHM but what would truly make it exceptional IMO would be better integration with the surrounding city and especially with spots frequented by locals. Right now it's effectively the "colonial history superblock" that 60s planners wanted at the heart of a Boston of more modern ones. We dodged a bullet by avoiding the redevelopment of the rest of the Shawmut peninsula, but City Hall Plaza + the commercial skyscrapers to the south + the width of the surrounding streets effectively isolate the space in the same way that was envisioned.

Somewhere around here ablarc also articulated an interesting critique based on the fact that the market originally had an upscale, artisanal vibe that attracted a healthy mix of locals that has since declined as the place has been overtaken by tourist trinketry. A more careful curation of retail could help.

statler
03-03-2012, 01:07 PM
I'm sure the national mall outfit that just took over the lease will get right on that.

found5dollar
03-03-2012, 02:46 PM
really? the last tenement? i just don't understand the other people on this board sometimes.... What redeeming facts does it have besides being odd looking? without the rest of the west end still there it is almost an eyesore.

datadyne007
03-03-2012, 02:57 PM
really? the last tenement? i just don't understand the other people on this board sometimes.... What redeeming facts does it have besides being odd looking? without the rest of the west end still there it is almost an eyesore.

It is an eyesore and could even be preventing development. The West End is gone and people need to get over it. You can't reverse the past, only look to the future.

Also why the heck was the bridge and Garden split?

kz1000ps
03-03-2012, 03:03 PM
I'm with you, found5dollar. It's so devoid of context that I can't help seeing it for what it is -- a boring tenement. That it now has historical significance nets it a few novelty points, but that's about it.

vanshnookenraggen
03-03-2012, 06:35 PM
I voted for it and here's why: it is a unique and historic part of Boston that is very identifiable to anyone who's ever lived there. And also because I grew up with The Little House.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Sjn5Gbv0PKk/Tzwe1K9PYRI/AAAAAAAAEWs/SfygBdFOlVc/s1600/little+house.jpg

whighlander
03-03-2012, 07:49 PM
It is an eyesore and could even be preventing development. The West End is gone and people need to get over it. You can't reverse the past, only look to the future.

Also why the heck was the bridge and Garden split?

It's no longer anything except a not that old, not particularly disringuished small building hanging out in the middle of nowhere. Once the Leachemere tressle that nearly ran through the place was removed -- it ceased to have any meaning and connection to the old West End.

Soon Leachemere Station will be gone and all that will then remain of the old Green Line elevated will be the viaduct from Science Park to Obrien Highway (err Boulevard).

statler
03-03-2012, 08:09 PM
It is an eyesore and could even be preventing development. The West End is gone and people need to get over it. You can't reverse the past, only look to the future.

No one is looking to 'reverse' history, just remember it and learn from it.

The last tenement serves as a powerful tool for that purpose.

whighlander
03-03-2012, 08:56 PM
^ I like FHM but what would truly make it exceptional IMO would be better integration with the surrounding city and especially with spots frequented by locals. Right now it's effectively the "colonial history superblock" that 60s planners wanted at the heart of a Boston of more modern ones. We dodged a bullet by avoiding the redevelopment of the rest of the Shawmut peninsula, but City Hall Plaza + the commercial skyscrapers to the south + the width of the surrounding streets effectively isolate the space in the same way that was envisioned.

Somewhere around here ablarc also articulated an interesting critique based on the fact that the market originally had an upscale, artisanal vibe that attracted a healthy mix of locals that has since declined as the place has been overtaken by tourist trinketry. A more careful curation of retail could help.

CZ -- No that was 20's planners -- as in 1825 -- when Mayor Josiah Quincy asked Alexander Paris to create Quincy Market Central Building to supplement Faneuil Hall

Really all that Kevin White, ben Thompson and Rouse did in the 190's was to restore the market to its original design and to introduce some modern materials to expand the market outside of the Granite core.

actually the Colonia History Superblock is the "Blackstone Block" including Scotts Alley and the house John Hancock built for his brother Ebenezer

BostonUrbEx
03-03-2012, 09:15 PM
No one is looking to 'reverse' history, just remember it and learn from it.

The last tenement serves as a powerful tool for that purpose.

I think it's a pretty shitty way to remember the West End. It almost makes think, "Thank God that craphole is gone!"

It would be more significant if it was a whole row, perhaps. And maybe scrub her down or something, sheesh.

czsz
03-04-2012, 11:17 PM
CZ -- No that was 20's planners -- as in 1825 -- when Mayor Josiah Quincy asked Alexander Paris to create Quincy Market Central Building to supplement Faneuil Hall

Really all that Kevin White, ben Thompson and Rouse did in the 190's was to restore the market to its original design and to introduce some modern materials to expand the market outside of the Granite core.

actually the Colonia History Superblock is the "Blackstone Block" including Scotts Alley and the house John Hancock built for his brother Ebenezer

You're missing my point. Quincy Market isn't a superblock because it's a unified whole (actually, it wasn't until recently - fully functioning streets ran between each one of the market buildings), it's a superblock because of the effect of the surrounding development. There are the large-footprint skyscrapers to the south and southwest, six lanes of Congress Street and City Hall Plaza to the west, the former expressway / current Greenway to the east, the Holocaust Memorial Park and the Hard Rock garage to the north, and just a small bit of Blackstone Block frontage and a couple feeder streets to State that work well to the south to tie it to the rest of the city --otherwise, it's isolated.